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Nutrients 2017, 9(10), 1132; doi:10.3390/nu9101132

Citrulline Malate Does Not Improve Muscle Recovery after Resistance Exercise in Untrained Young Adult Men

1
Center for Research in Health Sciences, North University of Paraná (UNOPAR), 675 Paris Ave., Londrina 86041-120, Brazil
2
Laboratory of Functional Evaluation and Human Motor Performance, LAFUP, Center for Research in Health Sciences, North Univeristy of Paraná (UNOPAR), 675 Paris Ave., Londrina 86041-120, Brazil
3
Département des Sciences de la Santé, Programme de Physiothérapie de L’université McGill Offert en Extension à L’UNIVERSITÉ du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC), 555 boul. De L’université, ville du Saguenay, Québec, QC G7H 5B8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 3 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 18 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein for Post-Exercise Recovery and Performance)
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Abstract

The effects of citrulline malate (CM) on muscle recovery from resistance exercise remains unknown. We aimed to determine if citrulline malate supplementation improves muscle recovery after a single session of high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) in untrained young adult men. Nine young adult men (24.0 ± 3.3 years) participated in a double-blind crossover study in which they received 6 g of CM and placebo (PL) on two occasions, separated by a seven-day washout period. Each occasion consisted of a single session of high-intensity RE (0 h) and three subsequent fatigue tests sessions (at 24, 48, and 72 h) to assess the time course of muscle recovery. During the tests sessions, we assessed the following variables: number of maximum repetitions, electromyographic signal (i.e., root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MF)), muscle soreness and perceived exertion, as well as blood levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate, insulin, and testosterone:cortisol ratio. CK levels increased at 24 h post-exercise and remained elevate at 48 and 72 h, with no difference between CM and PL conditions. Muscle soreness increased at 24 h post-exercise, which progressively returned to baseline at 72 h in both conditions. Lactate levels increased immediately post-exercise and remained elevated at 24, 48, and 72 h in both conditions. No significant treatment × time interaction was found for all dependents variables (maximum repetitions, perceived exertion, CK, lactate, RMS, MF, and testosterone:cortisol ratio) during the recovery period. In conclusion, our data indicate that CM supplementation (single 6 g dose pre-workout) does not improve the muscle recovery process following a high-intensity RE session in untrained young adult men. View Full-Text
Keywords: supplementation; skeletal muscle; weight training; amino acids; protein; exercise supplementation; skeletal muscle; weight training; amino acids; protein; exercise
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da Silva, D.K.; Jacinto, J.L.; de Andrade, W.B.; Roveratti, M.C.; Estoche, J.M.; Balvedi, M.C.W.; de Oliveira, D.B.; da Silva, R.A.; Aguiar, A.F. Citrulline Malate Does Not Improve Muscle Recovery after Resistance Exercise in Untrained Young Adult Men. Nutrients 2017, 9, 1132.

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