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Nutrients 2017, 9(1), 80; doi:10.3390/nu9010080

Social Dysfunction and Diet Outcomes in People with Psychosis

1
Faculty Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
2
Brain and Mental Health Program, Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton 2305, Australia
3
Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health, Mater Hospital, Waratah 2298, Australia
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah 2298, Australia
5
Hunter Cancer Research Alliance, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
6
Faculty of Science, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
7
Priority Research Centre GrowUpWell, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
8
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton 2305, Australia
9
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 November 2016 / Revised: 26 December 2016 / Accepted: 11 January 2017 / Published: 19 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Mental Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [232 KB, uploaded 19 January 2017]

Abstract

This analysis aimed to examine the association of social dysfunction with food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption in people with psychosis from the Hunter New England (HNE) catchment site of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP). Social dysfunction and dietary information were collected using standardised tools. Independent binary logistic regressions were used to examine the association between social dysfunction and food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption. Although social dysfunction did not have a statistically significant association with most diet variables, participants with obvious to severe social dysfunction were 0.872 (95% CI (0.778, 0.976)) less likely to eat breakfast than those with no social dysfunction p < 0.05. Participants with social dysfunction were therefore, 13% less likely to have breakfast. This paper highlights high rates of social dysfunction, significant food insecurity, and intakes of fruits and vegetables below recommendations in people with psychosis. In light of this, a greater focus needs to be given to dietary behaviours and social dysfunction in lifestyle interventions delivered to people with psychosis. Well-designed observational research is also needed to further examine the relationship between social dysfunction and dietary behaviour in people with psychosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychosis; social isolation; social dysfunction; fruit intake; vegetable intake; food security; diet psychosis; social isolation; social dysfunction; fruit intake; vegetable intake; food security; diet
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mucheru, D.; Hanlon, M.-C.; Campbell, L.E.; McEvoy, M.; MacDonald-Wicks, L. Social Dysfunction and Diet Outcomes in People with Psychosis. Nutrients 2017, 9, 80.

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