Next Article in Journal
The CSIRO Healthy Diet Score: An Online Survey to Estimate Compliance with the Australian Dietary Guidelines
Previous Article in Journal
Biomarkers to Monitor Gluten-Free Diet Compliance in Celiac Patients
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2017, 9(1), 44; doi:10.3390/nu9010044

Multilevel Analysis of Factors Associated with Wasting and Underweight among Children Under-Five Years in Nigeria

1
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith NSW 2571, Australia
2
School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia
3
School of Social Sciences and Psychology, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith NSW 2751, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 September 2016 / Revised: 29 November 2016 / Accepted: 3 January 2017 / Published: 8 January 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1168 KB, uploaded 8 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

Wasting and underweight reflect poor nutrition, which in children leads to retarded growth. The aim of this study is to determine the factors associated with wasting and underweight among children aged 0–59 months in Nigeria. A sample of 24,529 children aged 0–59 months from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) was used. Multilevel logistic regression analysis that adjusted for cluster and survey weights was used to identify significant factors associated with wasting/severe wasting and underweight/severe underweight. The prevalence of wasting was 18% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 17.1, 19.7) and severe wasting 9% (95% CI: 7.9, 9.8). The prevalence of underweight was 29% (95% CI: 27.1, 30.5) and severe underweight 12% (95% CI: 10.6, 12.9). Multivariable analysis revealed that the most consistent factors associated with wasting/severe wasting and underweight/severe underweight are: geopolitical zone (North East, North West and North Central), perceived birth size (small and average), sex of child (male), place/mode of delivery (home delivery and non-caesarean) and a contraction of fever in the two weeks prior to the survey. In order to meet the WHO’s global nutrition target for 2025, interventions aimed at improving maternal health and access to health care services for children especially in the northern geopolitical zones of Nigeria are urgently needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: wasting; underweight; Nigeria; public health; malnutrition; multilevel analysis wasting; underweight; Nigeria; public health; malnutrition; multilevel analysis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Akombi, B.J.; Agho, K.E.; Merom, D.; Hall, J.J.; Renzaho, A.M. Multilevel Analysis of Factors Associated with Wasting and Underweight among Children Under-Five Years in Nigeria. Nutrients 2017, 9, 44.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top