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Nutrients 2017, 9(1), 19; doi:10.3390/nu9010019

Maternal Circulating Lipid Profile during Early Pregnancy: Racial/Ethnic Differences and Association with Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

1
Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, School of Osteopathic Medicine, Rowan University, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA
2
Department of Surgery, School of Osteopathic Medicine, Rowan University, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA
3
Department of Psychiatry, School of Osteopathic Medicine, Rowan University, Stratford, NJ 08084, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 October 2016 / Revised: 13 December 2016 / Accepted: 23 December 2016 / Published: 1 January 2017
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Abstract

Prior reports on the association between altered maternal serum lipid levels with preterm delivery are inconsistent. Ethnic differences in serum lipids during pregnancy and their relation to preterm delivery have not been studied. We examined the relationships of six maternal lipids during early pregnancy with the risk of spontaneous preterm delivery (SPTD). The design represents a case-control study nested within a large prospective, multiethnic cohort of young, generally healthy pregnant women. SPTD cases (n = 183) and controls who delivered at term (n = 376) were included. SPTD is defined as delivery at <37 completed weeks of gestation without indicated conditions. We found that African-American women had significantly increased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), and lower triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels compared to Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caucasians combined. Elevated HDL-C and apoA1 concentrations were significantly associated with an increased odds of SPTD after controlling for potential confounding factors. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was 1.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 3.20) for the highest quartile of HDL-C relative to the lowest quartile, and for apoA1 the AOR was 1.94 (95% CI 1.16, 3.24). When controlling for ethnicity, the results remained comparable. These data suggest that pregnant African-American women had a more favorable lipid profile suggestive of a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Despite this, increased HDL-C and apoA1 were both found to be associated with SPTD. View Full-Text
Keywords: spontaneous preterm delivery; serum lipid levels; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; apolipoprotein A1; racial/ethnic disparity spontaneous preterm delivery; serum lipid levels; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; apolipoprotein A1; racial/ethnic disparity
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, X.; Scholl, T.O.; Stein, T.P.; Steer, R.A.; Williams, K.P. Maternal Circulating Lipid Profile during Early Pregnancy: Racial/Ethnic Differences and Association with Spontaneous Preterm Delivery. Nutrients 2017, 9, 19.

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