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Nutrients 2017, 9(1), 16; doi:10.3390/nu9010016

Application of an In Vivo Hepatic Triacylglycerol Production Method in the Setting of a High-Fat Diet in Mice

1
Arkansas Children’s Nutrition Center, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72202, USA
3
XOMA Corporation, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 October 2016 / Revised: 2 December 2016 / Accepted: 21 December 2016 / Published: 28 December 2016
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Abstract

High-fat (HF) diets typically promote diet-induced obesity (DIO) and metabolic dysfunction (i.e., insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia, and hepatic steatosis). Dysfunction of triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism may contribute to the development of hepatic steatosis, via increased de novo lipogenesis or repackaging of circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs). Hepatic TAG production (HTP) rate can be assessed through injecting mice with nonionic detergents that inhibit tissue lipoprotein lipase. Potential confounding effects of detergent-based HTP tests (HTPTs) used in longitudinal studies—including the impact on food intake, energy balance, and weight gain—have not been reported. To examine this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed a 10% or 60% kcal diet. After 4 weeks, the mice underwent an HTPT via poloxamer 407 intraperitoneal injections (1000 mg/kg). Weight gain, energy intake, and postabsorptive TAG levels normalized 7–10 days post-HTPT. The post-HTPT recovery of body weight and energy intake suggest that, in metabolic phenotyping studies, any additional sample collection should occur at least 7–10 days after the HTPT to reduce confounding effects. Diet-specific effects on HTP were also observed: HF-fed mice had reduced HTP, plasma TAG, and NEFA levels compared to controls. In conclusion, the current study highlights the procedural and physiological complexities associated with studying lipid metabolism using a HTPT in the DIO mouse model. View Full-Text
Keywords: triacylglycerols; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; high fat; DIO; fatty acid synthase; poloxamer 407 triacylglycerols; non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; high fat; DIO; fatty acid synthase; poloxamer 407
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Ono-Moore, K.D.; Ferguson, M.; Blackburn, M.L.; Issafras, H.; Adams, S.H. Application of an In Vivo Hepatic Triacylglycerol Production Method in the Setting of a High-Fat Diet in Mice. Nutrients 2017, 9, 16.

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