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Nutrients 2016, 8(8), 514; doi:10.3390/nu8080514

Oral Administration of Fermented Soymilk Products Protects the Skin of Hairless Mice against Ultraviolet Damage

Yakult Central Institute, Tokyo 186-8650, Japan
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Received: 9 June 2016 / Revised: 9 August 2016 / Accepted: 15 August 2016 / Published: 20 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Soybean and other Grain Legumes)
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Abstract

The protective effect of isoflavones on skin damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and their bioavailability were investigated in ovariectomized hairless mice fed diets composed of fermented soymilk containing aglycone forms of isoflavones or control soymilk containing glucose-conjugated forms of isoflavones. The erythema intensity of dorsal skin was significantly higher in ovariectomized mice than in sham-operated mice (p < 0.05). The erythema intensity and epidermal thickness of dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control diet group (each p < 0.05). Levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Serum and dorsal skin isoflavone concentrations were significantly higher in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the soymilk diet group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that oral administration of a fermented soymilk diet increases isoflavone concentrations in the blood and skin, effectively scavenging the reactive oxygen species generated by UV irradiation and exerting an estrogen-like activity, with a consequent protective effect on skin photodamage in hairless mice. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultraviolet radiation; oxidative DNA damage; skin thickness; isoflavone; soymilk; fermented soymilk ultraviolet radiation; oxidative DNA damage; skin thickness; isoflavone; soymilk; fermented soymilk
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Kano, M.; Kubota, N.; Masuoka, N.; Hori, T.; Miyazaki, K.; Ishikawa, F. Oral Administration of Fermented Soymilk Products Protects the Skin of Hairless Mice against Ultraviolet Damage. Nutrients 2016, 8, 514.

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