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Nutrients 2016, 8(8), 511; doi:10.3390/nu8080511

Do Lower Calorie or Lower Fat Foods Have More Sodium Than Their Regular Counterparts?

1
Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
2
IHRC, Inc., 2 Ravinia Dr Ste 1750, Atlanta, GA 30346, USA
3
Department of Public Health, St. Catherine University, 2004 Randolph Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105, USA
4
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 July 2016 / Revised: 11 August 2016 / Accepted: 16 August 2016 / Published: 19 August 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [211 KB, uploaded 19 August 2016]

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare the sodium content of a regular food and its lower calorie/fat counterpart. Four food categories, among the top 20 contributing the most sodium to the US diet, met the criteria of having the most matches between regular foods and their lower calorie/fat counterparts. A protocol was used to search websites to create a list of “matches”, a regular and comparable lower calorie/fat food(s) under each brand. Nutrient information was recorded and analyzed for matches. In total, 283 matches were identified across four food categories: savory snacks (N = 44), cheese (N = 105), salad dressings (N = 90), and soups (N = 44). As expected, foods modified from their regular versions had significantly reduced average fat (total fat and saturated fat) and caloric profiles. Mean sodium content among modified salad dressings and cheeses was on average 8%–12% higher, while sodium content did not change with modification of savory snacks. Modified soups had significantly lower mean sodium content than their regular versions (28%–38%). Consumers trying to maintain a healthy diet should consider that sodium content may vary in foods modified to be lower in calories/fat. View Full-Text
Keywords: sodium; lower fat; lower calorie; food products; nutrient information sodium; lower fat; lower calorie; food products; nutrient information
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

John, K.A.; Maalouf, J.; B. Barsness, C.; Yuan, K.; Cogswell, M.E.; Gunn, J.P. Do Lower Calorie or Lower Fat Foods Have More Sodium Than Their Regular Counterparts? Nutrients 2016, 8, 511.

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