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Nutrients 2016, 8(8), 479; doi:10.3390/nu8080479

Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults

1
Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide 5001, SA, Australia
2
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide 5001, SA, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 May 2016 / Revised: 28 July 2016 / Accepted: 1 August 2016 / Published: 4 August 2016
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Abstract

Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = −0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep hygiene; caffeine intake; sleep quantity; sleep quality; caffeine food frequency questionnaire sleep hygiene; caffeine intake; sleep quantity; sleep quality; caffeine food frequency questionnaire
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Watson, E.J.; Coates, A.M.; Kohler, M.; Banks, S. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults. Nutrients 2016, 8, 479.

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