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Nutrients 2016, 8(12), 829; doi:10.3390/nu8120829

Dietary Fiber Analysis of Four Pulses Using AOAC 2011.25: Implications for Human Health

1
Cancer Prevention Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2
Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
3
Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 November 2016 / Revised: 5 December 2016 / Accepted: 16 December 2016 / Published: 21 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Soybean and other Grain Legumes)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [215 KB, uploaded 21 December 2016]

Abstract

Chickpeas, common beans, dry peas, and lentils are pulse crops that have been a cornerstone of the human diet since the inception of agriculture. However, the displacement of pulses from the diet by low fiber protein alternatives has resulted in a pervasive deficiency referred to as the dietary fiber gap. Using an analytical method American Association of Analytical Chemists (AOAC) 2011.25 that conforms to the Codex Alimentarius Commission consensus definition for dietary fiber, the fiber content of these pulse crops was evaluated in seed types used for commercial production. These pulse crops have 2 to 3 times more fiber per 100 g edible portion than other dietary staples. Moreover, there is marked variation in fiber content among cultivars of the same crop. We conclude that pulse crop consumption should be emphasized in efforts to close the dietary fiber gap. The substantial differences in fiber content among currently available cultivars within a crop can be used to further improve gains in fiber intake without the need to change dietary habits. This provides a rationale for cultivar-based food labeling. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary fiber; pulse crops; dietary fiber gap; common bean; chickpeas; dry peas; lentils; AOAC 2011.25 dietary fiber; pulse crops; dietary fiber gap; common bean; chickpeas; dry peas; lentils; AOAC 2011.25
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, Y.; McGee, R.; Vandemark, G.; Brick, M.; Thompson, H.J. Dietary Fiber Analysis of Four Pulses Using AOAC 2011.25: Implications for Human Health. Nutrients 2016, 8, 829.

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