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Nutrients 2015, 7(9), 8036-8057; doi:10.3390/nu7095379

Dietary Behaviours, Impulsivity and Food Involvement: Identification of Three Consumer Segments

1
Health Promotion Board, 3 Second Hospital Avenue, 168937 Singapore
2
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood VIC 3125, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 June 2015 / Revised: 8 September 2015 / Accepted: 10 September 2015 / Published: 18 September 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Choice and Nutrition: A Social Psychological Perspective)
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Abstract

This study aims to (1) identify consumer segments based on consumers’ impulsivity and level of food involvement, and (2) examine the dietary behaviours of each consumer segment. An Internet-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 530 respondents. The mean age of the participants was 49.2 ± 16.6 years, and 27% were tertiary educated. Two-stage cluster analysis revealed three distinct segments; “impulsive, involved” (33.4%), “rational, health conscious” (39.2%), and “uninvolved” (27.4%). The “impulsive, involved” segment was characterised by higher levels of impulsivity and food involvement (importance of food) compared to the other two segments. This segment also reported significantly more frequent consumption of fast foods, takeaways, convenience meals, salted snacks and use of ready-made sauces and mixes in cooking compared to the “rational, health conscious” consumers. They also reported higher frequency of preparing meals at home, cooking from scratch, using ready-made sauces and mixes in cooking and higher vegetable consumption compared to the “uninvolved” consumers. The findings show the need for customised approaches to the communication and promotion of healthy eating habits. View Full-Text
Keywords: impulsive behaviour; food involvement; fast foods; ready meals; eating behaviour; segmentation impulsive behaviour; food involvement; fast foods; ready meals; eating behaviour; segmentation
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Sarmugam, R.; Worsley, A. Dietary Behaviours, Impulsivity and Food Involvement: Identification of Three Consumer Segments. Nutrients 2015, 7, 8036-8057.

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