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Nutrients 2015, 7(8), 6139-6154; doi:10.3390/nu7085273

Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome

1
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cardiology, and Internal Medicine, Lawrence J. Ellis Ambulatory Care Center, University of California, Davis Health System, 4680 Y Street, Suite 0200, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
3
Center for Nutrition Research, Institute for Food Safety and Health, Illinois Institute of Technology, 6502 South Archer Road, Bedford Park, IL 60501, USA
January 2015.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 May 2015 / Revised: 11 July 2015 / Accepted: 14 July 2015 / Published: 27 July 2015
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Abstract

Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity. View Full-Text
Keywords: postprandial; bean; fiber; antioxidant capacity; metabolic syndrome postprandial; bean; fiber; antioxidant capacity; metabolic syndrome
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Reverri, E.J.; Randolph, J.M.; Steinberg, F.M.; Kappagoda, C.T.; Edirisinghe, I.; Burton-Freeman, B.M. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrients 2015, 7, 6139-6154.

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