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Nutrients 2015, 7(7), 5800-5815; doi:10.3390/nu7075251

Fruit, Vegetable and Dietary Carotenoid Intakes Explain Variation in Skin-Color in Young Caucasian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9AJ, Scotland, UK
3
School of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9AJ, Scotland, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 April 2015 / Revised: 22 June 2015 / Accepted: 8 July 2015 / Published: 15 July 2015
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Abstract

Fruit and vegetables contain carotenoid pigments, which accumulate in human skin, contributing to its yellowness. This effect has a beneficial impact on appearance. The aim was to evaluate associations between diet (fruit, vegetable and dietary carotenoid intakes) and skin color in young women. Ninety-one Caucasian women (Median and Interquartile Range (IQR) age 22.1 (18.1–29.1) years, BMI 22.9 (18.5–31.9) kg/m2) were recruited from the Hunter region (Australia). Fruit, vegetable and dietary carotenoid intakes were estimated by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Skin color was measured at nine body locations (sun exposed and unexposed sites) using spectrophotometry. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between fruit and vegetable intakes and skin yellowness adjusting for known confounders. Higher combined fruit and vegetable intakes (β = 0.8, p = 0.017) were associated with higher overall skin yellowness values. Higher fruit combined fruit and vegetable intakes (β = 1.0, p = 0.004) were associated with increased unexposed skin yellowness. Combined fruit and vegetables plus dietary carotenoid intakes contribute to skin yellowness in young Caucasian women. Evaluation of interventions using improvements in appearance as an incentive for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in young women is warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: fruit; vegetables; skin color; skin reflectance; dietary carotenoids fruit; vegetables; skin color; skin reflectance; dietary carotenoids
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Pezdirc, K.; Hutchesson, M.J.; Whitehead, R.; Ozakinci, G.; Perrett, D.; Collins, C.E. Fruit, Vegetable and Dietary Carotenoid Intakes Explain Variation in Skin-Color in Young Caucasian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2015, 7, 5800-5815.

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