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Nutrients 2015, 7(6), 4661-4688; doi:10.3390/nu7064661

The Difference in Nutrient Intakes between Chinese and Mediterranean, Japanese and American Diets

1
Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051, China
2
Department of Epidemiology & Health Statistics, School of Public Health, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
3
Chronic Disease Research Institute, School of Public Health, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 April 2015 / Revised: 18 May 2015 / Accepted: 27 May 2015 / Published: 9 June 2015
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Abstract

Across countries, the predominant diets are clearly different and highly related with human health. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate dietary nutrients between them. This study aimed to evaluate dietary nutrients in China and compare those between Chinese and Mediterranean (Italian), Japanese and American diets. Dietary intakes of 2659 subjects in south-east China, Zhejiang province, from 2010 to 2012, were estimated by three consecutive 24-h dietary recalls. The contribution of carbohydrate to total energy in Chinese subjects was lower than that in Japanese and American subjects, but higher than that in Italian subjects. However, the energy contribution from fat in Chinese subjects was higher than that in Japanese and American subjects, and similar to that in Italian subjects. Moreover, the Chinese diet had lower daily intakes of fiber, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin C, compared with the Japanese, American and Italian diets. Nevertheless, intakes of sodium, iron, copper and vitamin E were higher among Chinese people relative to the people of other three countries. The present study demonstrated that the structure of the Chinese diet has been shifting away from the traditional diet toward high-fat, low-carbohydrate and low-fiber diets, and nutrients intakes in Chinese people have been changing even worse than those in American people. View Full-Text
Keywords: Chinese diet; Mediterranean diet; Japanese diet; American diet; nutrient intake; macronutrients; micronutrients Chinese diet; Mediterranean diet; Japanese diet; American diet; nutrient intake; macronutrients; micronutrients
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Zhang, R.; Wang, Z.; Fei, Y.; Zhou, B.; Zheng, S.; Wang, L.; Huang, L.; Jiang, S.; Liu, Z.; Jiang, J.; Yu, Y. The Difference in Nutrient Intakes between Chinese and Mediterranean, Japanese and American Diets. Nutrients 2015, 7, 4661-4688.

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