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Nutrients 2015, 7(6), 3949-3958; doi:10.3390/nu7063949

The Contribution of Fortified Ready-to-Eat Cereal to Vitamin and Mineral Intake in the U.S. Population, NHANES 2007–2010

1
Nutrition Impact, LLC, 9725D Drive North, Battle Creek, MI 49014, USA
2
Buckley/Swartz, 300 Lynn Shore Drive, #603, Lynn, MA 01902, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 April 2015 / Accepted: 19 May 2015 / Published: 25 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessment of Nutrient Intakes)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [114 KB, uploaded 27 May 2015]

Abstract

Micronutrients play a pivotal role in achieving and maintaining optimum health across all life stages. Much of the U.S. population fails to meet Estimated Average Requirements (EARs) for key nutrients. This analysis aims to assess the contribution of fortified ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) to micronutrient intake for U.S. residents aged 2–18, 19–99, and 2–99 years of age according to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010 data. We used the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method to assess usual intake of 21 micronutrients and the percentage of the population under EARs and above Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL). Without fortification of RTECs, the percentage of those aged 2–18 years that were below EARs increased by 155, 163, 113, and 35% for niacin, iron, thiamin, and vitamin A, respectively. For vitamins B6 and zinc, the respective numbers were 118% and 60%. Adults aged 19–99 and 2–99 had lower percentages but similar outcomes. RTECs are associated with improved nutrient adequacy and do not widely affect prevalence above the UL. The data indicate that large proportions of the population fail to achieve micronutrient sufficiency without fortification, and that its use can help Americans reach national nutrient intake goals. View Full-Text
Keywords: ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC); fortification; micronutrient intakes; Estimated Average Requirements (EAR); Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL); adequate intake (AI) ready-to-eat cereal (RTEC); fortification; micronutrient intakes; Estimated Average Requirements (EAR); Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL); adequate intake (AI)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Fulgoni, V.L., III; Buckley, R.B. The Contribution of Fortified Ready-to-Eat Cereal to Vitamin and Mineral Intake in the U.S. Population, NHANES 2007–2010. Nutrients 2015, 7, 3949-3958.

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