Next Article in Journal
High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Infertile Women Referring for Assisted Reproduction
Next Article in Special Issue
Stability of Vitamin A, Iron and Zinc in Fortified Rice during Storage and Its Impact on Future National Standards and Programs—Case Study in Cambodia
Previous Article in Journal
Protective Effect of Vanillic Acid against Hyperinsulinemia, Hyperglycemia and Hyperlipidemia via Alleviating Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Inflammation in High-Fat Diet (HFD)-Fed Rats
Previous Article in Special Issue
Increasing Awareness and Use of Iodised Salt in a Marginalised Community Setting in North-West Pakistan
Article Menu

Export Article

Retraction published on 2 September 2016, see Nutrients 2016, 8(9), 542.

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2015, 7(12), 9960-9971; doi:10.3390/nu7125511

An Assessment of the Potential Impact of Fortification of Staples and Condiments on Micronutrient Intake of Young Children and Women of Reproductive Age in Bangladesh

1
Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), Geneva 1211, Switzerland
2
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), Phnom Penh 12201, Cambodia
3
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research (ICDDR), Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 6 October 2015 / Revised: 11 November 2015 / Accepted: 23 November 2015 / Published: 2 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients and National Strategies to Impact Health)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [522 KB, uploaded 2 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

Bangladesh has experienced rapid economic growth and achieved major health improvements in the past decade, but malnutrition rates remain high. A nationally representative study conducted in 2011 assessed the dietary habits of 841 children 24–59 months old; 1428 children 6–14 years old; and 1412 non-pregnant, non-lactating women. The study’s objective was to assess dietary intakes of key micronutrients and the consumption pattern of potentially fortifiable foods, and then to model the potential impact of fortification of key staple foods. The current intakes of several micronutrients, namely, iron, zinc, folate, vitamin A and vitamin B12, were found to be insufficient to meet the needs of Bangladesh’s children and women. The fortification of rice with iron and zinc and edible oil with vitamin A has the potential to fill a significant part of the nutrient gap, as these are consumed widely and in significant amounts. Wheat flour and sugar are not as promising food vehicles in the Bangladeshi context, as they were consumed by a smaller portion of the population and in smaller amounts. In conclusion, fortification of rice and oil is recommended to address the large gap in micronutrient intakes. View Full-Text
Keywords: micronutrients; food fortification; rice; wheat flour; oil; women of reproductive age; young children; Bangladesh micronutrients; food fortification; rice; wheat flour; oil; women of reproductive age; young children; Bangladesh
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Leyvraz, M.; Laillou, A.; Rahman, S.; Ahmed, T.; Rahman, A.S.; Alam, N.; Ireen, S.; Panagides, D. An Assessment of the Potential Impact of Fortification of Staples and Condiments on Micronutrient Intake of Young Children and Women of Reproductive Age in Bangladesh. Nutrients 2015, 7, 9960-9971.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top