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Nutrients 2015, 7(10), 8518-8531; doi:10.3390/nu7105412

Effects of Dietary Plant Sterols and Stanol Esters with Low- and High-Fat Diets in Chronic and Acute Models for Experimental Colitis

1
Tytgat Institute for Liver and Intestinal Research, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam 1105 BK, The Netherlands
2
Department of Human Biology or Pediatrics, School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht 6229 ER, The Netherlands
3
Department of Pathology, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, The Netherlands
4
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Bonn D-53127, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 July 2015 / Revised: 8 September 2015 / Accepted: 30 September 2015 / Published: 15 October 2015
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Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary plant sterols and stanols as their fatty acid esters on the development of experimental colitis. The effects were studied both in high- and low-fat diet conditions in two models, one acute and another chronic model of experimental colitis that resembles gene expression in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the first experiments in the high fat diet (HFD), we did not observe a beneficial effect of the addition of plant sterols and stanols on the development of acute dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) colitis. In the chronic CD4CD45RB T cell transfer colitis model, we mainly observed an effect of the presence of high fat on the development of colitis. In this HFD condition, the presence of plant sterol or stanol did not result in any additional effect. In the second experiments with low fat, we could clearly observe a beneficial effect of the addition of plant sterols on colitis parameters in the T cell transfer model, but not in the DSS model. This positive effect was related to the gender of the mice and on Treg presence in the colon. This suggests that especially dietary plant sterol esters may improve intestinal inflammation in a T cell dependent manner. View Full-Text
Keywords: experimental colitis; nutrition; plant sterols; plant stanols; inflammation; T cells experimental colitis; nutrition; plant sterols; plant stanols; inflammation; T cells
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

te Velde, A.A.; Brüll, F.; Heinsbroek, S.E.M.; Meijer, S.L.; Lütjohann, D.; Vreugdenhil, A.; Plat, J. Effects of Dietary Plant Sterols and Stanol Esters with Low- and High-Fat Diets in Chronic and Acute Models for Experimental Colitis. Nutrients 2015, 7, 8518-8531.

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