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Nutrients 2015, 7(10), 8321-8334; doi:10.3390/nu7105387

Body Mass Index and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

1,†
,
2,†
,
3
,
4
,
5
and
4,*
1
Department of Basical Medicine, Jining Medical University, 16 Hehua Road, Jining 272067, China
2
Department of Clinical Laboratory, Jining NO.1 People's Hospital, 6 Jiankang Road, Jining 272011, China
3
Department of Information Technology, Jining Medical University, 16 Hehua Road, Jining 272067, China
4
Department of Pathology, Jining Medical University, 16 Hehua Road, Jining 272067, China
5
Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Jining Medical University, 79 Guhuai Road, Jining 272029, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 August 2015 / Revised: 8 September 2015 / Accepted: 11 September 2015 / Published: 25 September 2015
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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To provide a quantitative assessment of the association between excess body weight, interpreted as increased body mass index (BMI), and the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC). METHODS: We identified eligible studies in Medline and EMBASE up to 1 February 2015, and reference lists of retrieved articles. Summary relative risks with their 95% confidence intervals were calculated in a random-effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed according to study design, gender, geographic location, ascertainment of exposure and adjustment for confounders. RESUITS: A total of 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with “normal” weight, the summary relative risks of GBC were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04–1.25) for overweight individuals (BMI 25–30 kg/m2) and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.41–1.73) for obese individuals (BMI > 30 kg/m2). Obese women had a higher risk of GBC than men did (women: SRRs 1.67, 95% CI 1.38–2.02; men: SRRs 1.42, 95% CI 1.21–1.66), and there was significant association between overweight and GBC risk in women (SRRs 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.40), but not in men (SRRs 1.06, 95% CI 0.94–1.20). CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that obesity is associated with an increased risk of GBC, especially in women. Overweight is associated with GBC risk only in women. View Full-Text
Keywords: overweight; obesity; body mass index; gallbladder cancer; meta-analysis overweight; obesity; body mass index; gallbladder cancer; meta-analysis
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Tan, W.; Gao, M.; Liu, N.; Zhang, G.; Xu, T.; Cui, W. Body Mass Index and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Nutrients 2015, 7, 8321-8334.

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