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Nutrients 2014, 6(9), 3431-3450; doi:10.3390/nu6093431

The Role of Sweet Taste in Satiation and Satiety

Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Received: 30 May 2014 / Revised: 4 August 2014 / Accepted: 19 August 2014 / Published: 2 September 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugar and Obesity)
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Abstract

Increased energy consumption, especially increased consumption of sweet energy-dense food, is thought to be one of the main contributors to the escalating rates in overweight individuals and obesity globally. The individual’s ability to detect or sense sweetness in the oral cavity is thought to be one of many factors influencing food acceptance, and therefore, taste may play an essential role in modulating food acceptance and/or energy intake. Emerging evidence now suggests that the sweet taste signaling mechanisms identified in the oral cavity also operate in the gastrointestinal system and may influence the development of satiety. Understanding the individual differences in detecting sweetness in both the oral and gastrointestinal system towards both caloric sugar and high intensity sweetener and the functional role of the sweet taste system may be important in understanding the reasons for excess energy intake. This review will summarize evidence of possible associations between the sweet taste mechanisms within the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract and the brain systems towards both caloric sugar and high intensity sweetener and sweet taste function, which may influence satiation, satiety and, perhaps, predisposition to being overweight and obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: oral sweet taste sensitivity; oral sensitivity; sensory specific satiety; satiety; obesity; BMI; sugar; sweeteners; appetite; sweet taste oral sweet taste sensitivity; oral sensitivity; sensory specific satiety; satiety; obesity; BMI; sugar; sweeteners; appetite; sweet taste
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Low, Y.Q.; Lacy, K.; Keast, R. The Role of Sweet Taste in Satiation and Satiety. Nutrients 2014, 6, 3431-3450.

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