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Nutrients 2014, 6(7), 2920-2930; doi:10.3390/nu6072920

Breastfeeding Trends in Cambodia, and the Increased Use of Breast-Milk Substitute—Why Is It a Danger?

1
Maternal and Child Health Center, N° 31A, Rue de France (St. 47), 12202 Phnom Penh, Cambodia
2
UNICEF, Maternal, Newborn Child Health and Nutrition Section, No. 11 Street 75, 12202 Phnom Penh, Cambodia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 May 2014 / Revised: 2 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 July 2014 / Published: 22 July 2014
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Abstract

A cross-sectional analysis of the Cambodia Demographic Health Surveys from 2000, 2005 and 2010 was conducted to observe the national trends in infant and young child feeding practices. The results showed that rates of exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged 0–5.9 months have increased substantially since 2000, concurrent with an increase in the rates of early initiation of breastfeeding and a reduction in the giving of pre-lacteal feeds. However, the proportion of infants being fed with breast-milk substitutes (BMS) during 0–5.9 months doubled in 5 years (3.4% to 7.0%) from 2000 to 2005, but then did not increase from 2005, likely due to extensive public health campaigns on exclusive breastfeeding. BMS use increased among children aged 6–23.9 months from 2000 to 2010 (4.8% to 9.3%). 26.1% of women delivering in a private clinic provided their child with breast-milk substitute at 0–5.9 months, which is five times more than women delivering in the public sector (5.1%), and the greatest increase in bottle use happened among the urban poor (5.8% to 21.7%). These findings are discussed with reference to the increased supply and marketing of BMS that is occurring in Cambodia. View Full-Text
Keywords: breastfeeding; infant and young child feeding; breast-milk substitute; the code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes breastfeeding; infant and young child feeding; breast-milk substitute; the code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Prak, S.; Dahl, M.I.; Oeurn, S.; Conkle, J.; Wise, A.; Laillou, A. Breastfeeding Trends in Cambodia, and the Increased Use of Breast-Milk Substitute—Why Is It a Danger? Nutrients 2014, 6, 2920-2930.

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