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Nutrients 2012, 4(11), 1542-1551; doi:10.3390/nu4111542
Communication

Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Cognition among Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment

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1 Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood 3125, Victoria, Australia 2 Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, St Vincent's Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3052, Australia 3 Division of Population Sciences, Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Western Australia, Australia 4 Western Australia Centre for Health and Ageing, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Western Australia, Australia 5 School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Australia
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 August 2012 / Revised: 19 October 2012 / Accepted: 19 October 2012 / Published: 25 October 2012
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Abstract

There has been increasing interest in the influence of diet on cognition in the elderly. This study examined the cross-sectional association between dietary patterns and cognition in a sample of 249 people aged 65–90 years with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Two dietary patterns; whole and processed food; were identified using factor analysis from a 107-item; self-completed Food Frequency Questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses showed that participants in the highest tertile of the processed food pattern score were more likely to have poorer cognitive functioning; in the lowest tertile of executive function (OR 2.55; 95% CI: 1.08–6.03); as assessed by the Cambridge Cognitive Examination. In a group of older people with MCI; a diet high in processed foods was associated with some level of cognitive impairment.
Keywords: dietary patterns; cognition; mild cognitive impairment; executive function; memory dietary patterns; cognition; mild cognitive impairment; executive function; memory
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Torres, S.J.; Lautenschlager, N.T.; Wattanapenpaiboon, N.; Greenop, K.R.; Beer, C.; Flicker, L.; Alfonso, H.; Nowson, C.A. Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Cognition among Older People with Mild Cognitive Impairment. Nutrients 2012, 4, 1542-1551.

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