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Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1247; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091247

Applicability of Yeast Fermentation to Reduce Fructans and Other FODMAPs

Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), 1190 Vienna, Austria
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Received: 13 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 4 September 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Benefits of Fermentation)
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Abstract

A diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and, polyols (FODMAPs) is recommended for people affected by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and non-coeliac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) in order to reduce symptoms. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 13 sourdough-related yeasts on FODMAP degradation, especially fructans. First, a model system containing a typical wheat carbohydrate profile was applied to evaluate the growth rate of each yeast strain. Additionally, changes in the sugar composition, for up to four days, were monitored by high-pressure anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC). A more realistic approach with a wheat flour suspension was used to characterize CO2 production according to the Einhorn method. The reduction of the total fructans was analyzed using an enzymatic method. Furthermore, a fingerprint of the present fructans with different degrees of polymerization was analyzed by HPAEC. The results revealed strong differences in the examined yeast strains’ ability to degrade fructans, in both the model system and wheat flour. Overall, Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Austrian traditional sourdough showed the highest degree of degradation of the total fructan content and the highest gas building capacity, followed by Torulaspora delbrueckii. Hence, this study provides novel knowledge about the FODMAP conversion of yeast strains. View Full-Text
Keywords: FODMAPs; fructan; IBS; wheat; sourdough; yeasts; fermentation FODMAPs; fructan; IBS; wheat; sourdough; yeasts; fermentation
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Fraberger, V.; Call, L.-M.; Domig, K.J.; D’Amico, S. Applicability of Yeast Fermentation to Reduce Fructans and Other FODMAPs. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1247.

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