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Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1193; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091193

Fatty Acid Profiles of Various Vegetable Oils and the Association between the Use of Palm Oil vs. Peanut Oil and Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in Yangon Region, Myanmar

1
Department of Community Medicine and Global Health, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway
2
Procurement and Supply Division, Department of Public Health, Ministry of Health and Sports, Nay Pyi Taw 15011, Myanmar
3
International Relations Division, Ministry of Health and Sports, Nay Pyi Taw 15011, Myanmar
4
Epidemiology Unit, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai 90110, Thailand
5
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Medicine 1, Yangon 11131, Myanmar
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
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Abstract

The majority of vegetable oils used in food preparation in Myanmar are imported and sold non-branded. Little is known about their fatty acid (FA) content. We aimed to investigate the FA composition of commonly used vegetable oils in the Yangon region, and the association between the use of palm oil vs. peanut oil and risk factors for non-communicable disease (NCD). A multistage cluster survey was conducted in 2016, and 128 oil samples from 114 households were collected. Data on NCD risk factors were obtained from a household-based survey in the same region, between 2013 and 2014. The oils most commonly sampled were non-branded peanut oil (43%) and non-branded palm oil (19%). Non-branded palm oil had a significantly higher content of saturated fatty acids (36.1 g/100 g) and a lower content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (9.3 g/100 g) than branded palm oil. No significant differences were observed regarding peanut oil. Among men, palm oil users had significantly lower mean fasting plasma glucose levels and mean BMI than peanut oil users. Among women, palm oil users had significantly higher mean diastolic blood pressure, and higher mean levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, than peanut oil users. Regulation of the marketing of non-branded oils should be encouraged. View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetable oils; palm oil; peanut oil; non-communicable diseases; Myanmar vegetable oils; palm oil; peanut oil; non-communicable diseases; Myanmar
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Aung, W.P.; Bjertness, E.; Htet, A.S.; Stigum, H.; Chongsuvivatwong, V.; Soe, P.P.; Kjøllesdal, M.K.R. Fatty Acid Profiles of Various Vegetable Oils and the Association between the Use of Palm Oil vs. Peanut Oil and Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in Yangon Region, Myanmar. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1193.

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