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Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 981; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10080981

Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated with Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

1
Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória CEP 29042-755, Brazil
2
Escola de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte CEP 30130-100, Brazil
3
Hospital das Clinicas and School of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte CEP 30130-100, Brazil
4
Clinical and Epidemiological Research Center, University Hospital, University of São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05508-000, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 July 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 27 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fructose and Glucose for Human Health)
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Abstract

The secular trend of hyperuricemia coincides with the substantial increase in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Our aim was to evaluate the association between the consumption of soft drinks, dietary fructose and unsweetened, non-processed fruit juices with hyperuricemia in a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2008–2010; n = 7173) of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The explanatory variables were the consumption of soft drinks, fruit juice, and fructose using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The outcomes were hyperuricemia and the uric acid concentration in serum. Regression models were tested, and a significance level of 5% was adopted. In men, the daily consumption of a portion of soft drink/day (250 mL) almost doubled the chance of hyperuricemia with a linear trend. In women, the consumption of ≥0.1 to <1.0 soft drink/day was associated with a higher chance of hyperuricemia, but there was no linear trend. High fructose consumption in men and moderate and high consumption in women were associated with hyperuricemia. All categories of soft drinks consumption were linearly associated with increased serum uric acid levels. Our findings suggest that the consumption of soft drinks and dietary fructose is positively associated with a higher chance of hyperuricemia and higher uric acid levels in Brazilian adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened soft drinks intake; fruit and vegetable juices; fructose; uric acid; hyperuricemia sugar-sweetened soft drinks intake; fruit and vegetable juices; fructose; uric acid; hyperuricemia
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Siqueira, J.H.; Mill, J.G.; Velasquez-Melendez, G.; Moreira, A.D.; Barreto, S.M.; Benseñor, I.M.; Molina, M.C.B. Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Fructose Consumption Are Associated with Hyperuricemia: Cross-Sectional Analysis from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Nutrients 2018, 10, 981.

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