Next Article in Journal
Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children and Adults with Gluten-Related Disorders: A Narrative Review
Previous Article in Journal
Limited Benefit of Fish Consumption on Risk of Hip Fracture among Men in the Community-Based Hordaland Health Study
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 874; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070874

Iodine Status and Consumption of Key Iodine Sources in the U.S. Population with Special Attention to Reproductive Age Women

1
Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA
2
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, CDC, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
3
Division of Laboratory Sciences, CDC, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 July 2018 / Published: 6 July 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [833 KB, uploaded 9 July 2018]   |  

Abstract

We estimated iodine status (median urinary iodine concentration (mUIC (µg/L))) for the US population (6 years and over; n = 4613) and women of reproductive age (WRA) (15–44 years; n = 901). We estimated mean intake of key iodine sources by race and Hispanic origin. We present the first national estimates of mUIC for non-Hispanic Asian persons and examine the intake of soy products, a potential source of goitrogens. One-third of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) participants in 2011–2014 provided casual urine samples; UIC was measured in these samples. We assessed dietary intake with one 24-h recall and created food groups using the USDA’s food/beverage coding scheme. For WRA, mUIC was 110 µg/L. For both non-Hispanic white (106 µg/L) and non-Hispanic Asian (81 µg/L) WRA mUIC was significantly lower than mUIC among Hispanic WRA (133 µg/L). Non-Hispanic black WRA had a mUIC of 124 µg/L. Dairy consumption was significantly higher among non-Hispanic white (162 g) compared to non-Hispanic black WRA (113 g). Soy consumption was also higher among non-Hispanic Asian WRA (18 g compared to non-Hispanic black WRA (1 g). Differences in the consumption pattern of key sources of iodine and goitrogens may put subgroups of individuals at risk of mild iodine deficiency. Continued monitoring of iodine status and variations in consumption patterns is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: iodine status; urinary iodine concentration; food group intake; dairy products; grains; soy; goitrogens; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey iodine status; urinary iodine concentration; food group intake; dairy products; grains; soy; goitrogens; National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Herrick, K.A.; Perrine, C.G.; Aoki, Y.; Caldwell, K.L. Iodine Status and Consumption of Key Iodine Sources in the U.S. Population with Special Attention to Reproductive Age Women. Nutrients 2018, 10, 874.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top