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Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 705; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060705

Impact of Alcohol and Coffee Intake on the Risk of Advanced Liver Fibrosis: A Longitudinal Analysis in HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients (ANRS CO-13 HEPAVIH Cohort)

1
Aix Marseille Université, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Sciences Economiques & Sociales de la Santé & Traitement de l’Information Médicale, 27 Bd Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
2
ORS PACA, Observatoire Régional de la Santé Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur, 27 Bd Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
3
Service de Médecine Interne, Hôpital Saint André, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Université de Bordeaux, 1 Rue Jean Burguet, 33000 Bordeaux, France
4
ISPED, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, Team MORPH3EUS, UMR 1219, CIC-EC 1401, Université Bordeaux, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
5
Département des Maladies Infectieuses, Hôpital Tenon, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France
6
Ministério da Saúde, Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde, Departamento de Vigilância, Prevenção e Controle das IST, do HIV/Aids e das Hepatites Virais, Brasília 70719-040, Brazil
7
Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde Coletiva, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília 70910-900, Brazil
8
CHU de Bordeaux, Pole de Sante Publique, Service d’Information Medicale, F-33000 Bordeaux, France
9
Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, AP-HP, Hôpital Bichat Claude Bernard, 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, France
10
INSERM U-1223, Institut Pasteur, Service d’Hépatologie, Hôpital Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, 27 rue du Faubourg Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France
11
Service Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, AP-HP, Hôpital Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, 27 rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France
The ANRS CO13-HEPAVIH Study Group is provided in the Acknowledgments.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 April 2018 / Revised: 26 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 31 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impact of Caffeine and Coffee on Human Health)
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Abstract

Background: Coffee intake has been shown to modulate both the effect of ethanol on serum GGT activities in some alcohol consumers and the risk of alcoholic cirrhosis in some patients with chronic diseases. This study aimed to analyze the impact of coffee intake and alcohol consumption on advanced liver fibrosis (ALF) in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. Methods: ANRS CO13-HEPAVIH is a French, nationwide, multicenter cohort of HIV-HCV-co-infected patients. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical data including alcohol and coffee consumption were prospectively collected using annual self-administered questionnaires during five years of follow-up. Mixed logistic regression models were performed, relating coffee intake and alcohol consumption to ALF. Results: 1019 patients were included. At the last available visit, 5.8% reported high-risk alcohol consumption, 27.4% reported high coffee intake and 14.5% had ALF. Compared with patients with low coffee intake and high-risk alcohol consumption, patients with low coffee intake and low-risk alcohol consumption had a lower risk of ALF (aOR (95% CI) 0.24 (0.12–0.50)). In addition, patients with high coffee intake had a lower risk of ALF than the reference group (0.14 (0.03–0.64) in high-risk alcohol drinkers and 0.11 (0.05–0.25) in low-risk alcohol drinkers). Conclusions: High coffee intake was associated with a low risk of liver fibrosis even in HIV-HCV co-infected patients with high-risk alcohol consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: HIV-HCV co-infection; liver fibrosis; coffee; alcohol consumption HIV-HCV co-infection; liver fibrosis; coffee; alcohol consumption
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Yaya, I.; Marcellin, F.; Costa, M.; Morlat, P.; Protopopescu, C.; Pialoux, G.; Santos, M.E.; Wittkop, L.; Esterle, L.; Gervais, A.; Sogni, P.; Salmon-Ceron, D.; Carrieri, M.P.; the ANRS CO13-HEPAVIH Cohort Study Group. Impact of Alcohol and Coffee Intake on the Risk of Advanced Liver Fibrosis: A Longitudinal Analysis in HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients (ANRS CO-13 HEPAVIH Cohort). Nutrients 2018, 10, 705.

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