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Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 599; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050599

Dietary Fibre Intake in Australia. Paper I: Associations with Demographic, Socio-Economic, and Anthropometric Factors

1
Nutrition Research Australia, Level 13 167 Macquarie Street, Sydney 2000, Australia
2
Department of Statistics, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 April 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
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Abstract

Dietary fibre is important for regular laxation and reduces chronic disease risk. The National Health and Medical Research Council outlines daily fibre intake targets, yet the proportion of the population that meets these targets is unknown. Using the 2011–2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, we profiled fibre intake among Australian children and adults. Data from one-day dietary recalls were analysed (n = 12,153, ≥2 years) as well as demographic and anthropometric factors. The median fibre intake was 18.2 g (interquartile range [IQR] 13.2–25.0) in children and 20.7 g (IQR 14.3–28.7) in adults. We found that 42.3% (95% CI 40.5–44.1%) of children and 28.2% (95% CI 27.3–29.1%) of adults met the Adequate Intake (AI), and less than 20% of adults met the Suggested Dietary Target (SDT) to reduce the risk of chronic disease. Older children (aged 14–18 years), girls, young adults (19–30 years), males, and those of lower socio-economic status were less likely to meet the AI (p < 0.001). Those with a higher energy intake were more likely to meet the AI. Anthropometric measures were not associated with fibre intake or the likelihood of meeting the AI. Fibre is a nutrient of concern in Australian diets, with most children and adults falling short of recommendations. Adolescents, girls, young adults, men, and those of lower socio-economic status were less likely to meet the recommendations and may benefit most from public health interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary fibre; socio-economic; BMI; Australia; National Nutrition Survey; Adequate Intake; Suggested Daily Target dietary fibre; socio-economic; BMI; Australia; National Nutrition Survey; Adequate Intake; Suggested Daily Target
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Fayet-Moore, F.; Cassettari, T.; Tuck, K.; McConnell, A.; Petocz, P. Dietary Fibre Intake in Australia. Paper I: Associations with Demographic, Socio-Economic, and Anthropometric Factors. Nutrients 2018, 10, 599.

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