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Nutrients 2018, 10(2), 156; doi:10.3390/nu10020156

The GReat-Child™ Trial: A Quasi-Experimental Intervention on Whole Grains with Healthy Balanced Diet to Manage Childhood Obesity in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

1
Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2
Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 January 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
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Abstract

Background: The GReat-Child Trial was a quasi-experimental intervention that has emphasized whole grain as a strategy to manage childhood obesity. Methods: Two schools in Kuala Lumpur with similar demographic characteristics were assigned as intervention (IG) and control (CG). Eligibility criteria were overweight/obese children aged 9 to 11 years who had no serious co-morbidity. Children who reported consuming wholegrain foods in their 3-day diet-recall during screening were excluded. A total of 63 children (31 IG; 32 CG) completed the entire intervention program. The IG children underwent six 30-min nutrition education lessons and had school delivery of wholegrain food on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Parents of IG children attended 1-h individual diet counseling. Anthropometric outcomes including BMI-for-age z-score (BAZ), body fat percentage and waist circumference were measured at baseline [T0], post-intervention [T1] (3rd month) and follow-up [T2] (9th month). Results: IG showed significantly lower BAZ (weighted difference: −0.12; 95% CI: −0.21, −0.03; p = 0.009), body fat percentage (weighted difference: −2.6%; 95% CI: −3.7, −1.5; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.4 cm; 95% CI: −3.8, −1.0; p = 0.001) compared to CG. IG reported significantly lower body fat percentage (weighted difference: −3.4%; 95% CI: 1.8, 5.0; p < 0.001) and waist circumference (weighted difference: −2.1 cm; 95% CI: −3.7, −0.5; p = 0.014) at T1 compared to T0. Conclusions: The GReat-Child Trial made a positive impact in managing childhood obesity. It can be incorporated into childhood obesity intervention programs that are being implemented by the policy makers. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood obesity; intervention; Malaysia; whole grain childhood obesity; intervention; Malaysia; whole grain
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Koo, H.C.; Poh, B.K.; Abd Talib, R. The GReat-Child™ Trial: A Quasi-Experimental Intervention on Whole Grains with Healthy Balanced Diet to Manage Childhood Obesity in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Nutrients 2018, 10, 156.

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