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Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010047

Considerations for Secondary Prevention of Nutritional Deficiencies in High-Risk Groups in High-Income Countries

DSM Nutritional Products, Wurmisweg 576, Kaiseraugst CH-4303, Switzerland
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Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 28 December 2017 / Published: 5 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements)
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Abstract

Surveys in high-income countries show that inadequacies and deficiencies can be common for some nutrients, particularly in vulnerable subgroups of the population. Inadequate intakes, high requirements for rapid growth and development, or age- or disease-related impairments in nutrient intake, digestion, absorption, or increased nutrient losses can lead to micronutrient deficiencies. The consequent subclinical conditions are difficult to recognize if not screened for and often go unnoticed. Nutrient deficiencies can be persistent despite primary nutrition interventions that are aimed at improving dietary intakes. Secondary prevention that targets groups at high risk of inadequacy or deficiency, such as in the primary care setting, can be a useful complementary approach to address persistent nutritional gaps. However, this strategy is often underestimated and overlooked as potentially cost-effective means to prevent future health care costs and to improve the health and quality of life of individuals. In this paper, the authors discuss key appraisal criteria to consider when evaluating the benefits and disadvantages of a secondary prevention of nutrient deficiencies through screening. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrient inadequacies and deficiencies; nutritional supplements; biomarkers; nutrition screening; public health; cost-effectiveness nutrient inadequacies and deficiencies; nutritional supplements; biomarkers; nutrition screening; public health; cost-effectiveness
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Bruins, M.J.; Bird, J.K.; Aebischer, C.P.; Eggersdorfer, M. Considerations for Secondary Prevention of Nutritional Deficiencies in High-Risk Groups in High-Income Countries. Nutrients 2018, 10, 47.

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