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Remote Sens. 2017, 9(2), 131; doi:10.3390/rs9020131

Salt Marsh Monitoring in Jamaica Bay, New York from 2003 to 2013: A Decade of Change from Restoration to Hurricane Sandy

1
Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island, 1 Greenhouse Rd., Kingston, RI 02881, USA
2
Kaibab National Forest, United States Department of Agriculture, Williams, AZ 86046, USA
3
Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, National Park Service, Kingston, RI 02881, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Xiaofeng Li, Assefa M. Melesse and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 26 December 2016 / Revised: 26 December 2016 / Accepted: 24 January 2017 / Published: 6 February 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [25140 KB, uploaded 6 February 2017]   |  

Abstract

This study used Quickbird-2 and Worldview-2, high resolution satellite imagery, in a multi-temporal salt marsh mapping and change analysis of Jamaica Bay, New York. An object-based image analysis methodology was employed. The study seeks to understand both natural and anthropogenic changes caused by Hurricane Sandy and salt marsh restoration, respectively. The objectives of this study were to: (1) document salt marsh change in Jamaica Bay from 2003 to 2013; (2) determine the impact of Hurricane Sandy on salt marshes within Jamaica Bay; (3) evaluate this long term monitoring methodology; and (4) evaluate the use of multiple sensor derived classifications to conduct change analysis. The study determined changes from 2003 to 2008, 2008 to 2012 and 2012 to 2013 to better understand the impact of restoration and natural disturbances. The study found that 21 ha of salt marsh vegetation was lost from 2003 to 2013. From 2012 to 2013, restoration efforts resulted in an increase of 10.6 ha of salt marsh. Hurricane Sandy breached West Pond, a freshwater environment, causing 3.1 ha of freshwater wetland loss. The natural salt marsh showed a decreasing trend in loss. Larger salt marshes in 2012 tended to add vegetation in 2012–2013 (F4,6 = 13.93, p = 0.0357 and R2 = 0.90). The study provides important information for the resource management of Jamaica Bay. View Full-Text
Keywords: salt marsh; change analysis; Jamaica Bay; New York; Hurricane Sandy; long-term monitoring; Worldview-2; Quickbird-2 salt marsh; change analysis; Jamaica Bay; New York; Hurricane Sandy; long-term monitoring; Worldview-2; Quickbird-2
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Campbell, A.; Wang, Y.; Christiano, M.; Stevens, S. Salt Marsh Monitoring in Jamaica Bay, New York from 2003 to 2013: A Decade of Change from Restoration to Hurricane Sandy. Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 131.

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