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Remote Sens. 2017, 9(11), 1152; doi:10.3390/rs9111152

Use of High-Quality and Common Commercial Mirrors for Scanning Close-Range Surfaces Using 3D Laser Scanners: A Laboratory Experiment

1
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Alicante, 03690 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain
2
Department of Optics, Pharmacology and Anatomy, University of Alicante, 03690 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 10 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Uncertainty in Remote Sensing Image Analysis)
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Abstract

Three Dimension (3D) laser scanners enable the acquisition of millions of points of a visible object. Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) are ground-based scanners, and nowadays the available instruments have the ability of rotating their sensor in two axes, capturing almost any point. Since many sensors can only operate in a vertical position, they cannot capture points located beneath themselves. Consequently, these instruments are generally unable to capture data in a vertical descending direction. Moreover, since the device positioning has certain requirements of space and terrain stability, it is possible that specific regions of interest are outside the reach of the laser. A possible solution is to address the laser beam towards the desired direction by means of a mirror. Common mirrors are very cheap; therefore, they are easy to manipulate and to substitute in case they get broken. However, due to their careless fabrication process, it seems reasonable to think that they are unprecise. In contrast, front-end mirrors are more expensive and delicate, and consequently, deflecting angles are more precise. In this research, we designed a laboratory test to analyze the arising noise when standard and high-quality mirrors are used during the TLS scanning process. The results show that the noise introduced when scanning through a standard mirror is higher than that produced when using a high-quality mirror. However, both cases show that this introduced error is lower than the instrumental error. As a result, this study concludes that it is reasonable to use standard mirrors when scanning in similar conditions to this laboratory test. View Full-Text
Keywords: TLS; LiDAR; vertical scanning; standard mirror; front-end mirror TLS; LiDAR; vertical scanning; standard mirror; front-end mirror
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Riquelme, A.J.; Ferrer, B.; Mas, D. Use of High-Quality and Common Commercial Mirrors for Scanning Close-Range Surfaces Using 3D Laser Scanners: A Laboratory Experiment. Remote Sens. 2017, 9, 1152.

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