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Remote Sens. 2015, 7(4), 4626-4650; doi:10.3390/rs70404626

Remote Estimation of Leaf and Canopy Water Content in Winter Wheat with Different Vertical Distribution of Water-Related Properties

1
,
2,* , 1,†
,
2,†
and
1,†
1
College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
2
School of Remote Sensing and Information Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Yoshio Inoue and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 30 October 2014 / Revised: 5 April 2015 / Accepted: 8 April 2015 / Published: 17 April 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1312 KB, uploaded 17 April 2015]   |  

Abstract

This study analyzed the vertical distribution of gravimetric water content (GWC), relative water content (RWC), and equivalent water thickness (EWT) in winter wheat during heading and early ripening stages, and evaluated the position of leaf number at which Vegetation Indexes (VIs) can best retrieve canopy water-related properties of winter wheat. Results demonstrated that the vertical distribution of these properties followed a near-bell-shaped curve with the highest values at the intermediate leaf position. GWC of the top three or four leaves during the heading stage and the top two or three leaves during the early ripening stage can represent the GWC of the whole canopy, but the RWC and EWT of the whole canopy should be calculated based on the top four leaves. At leaf level, the analysis demonstrated strong relationships between EWT and VIs for the top leaf layer, but for GWCD, GWCF, and RWC, the strongest relationships with VIs were found in the intermediate leaf layers. At canopy level, VIs provided the most accurate estimation of GWCfor the top three or four leaves. Water absorption-based VIs could estimate canopy EWT of winter wheat for the top four leaves, but the suitable bands sensitive to water absorptions should be carefully selected for the studied species. View Full-Text
Keywords: vertical distribution; gravimetric water content (GWC); relative water content (RWC); equivalent water thickness (EWT); vegetation indexes vertical distribution; gravimetric water content (GWC); relative water content (RWC); equivalent water thickness (EWT); vegetation indexes
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, S.; Peng, Y.; Du, W.; Le, Y.; Li, L. Remote Estimation of Leaf and Canopy Water Content in Winter Wheat with Different Vertical Distribution of Water-Related Properties. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 4626-4650.

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