Next Article in Journal
Development and Evaluation of a Multi-Year Fractional Surface Water Data Set Derived from Active/Passive Microwave Remote Sensing Data
Previous Article in Journal
Development of Dense Time Series 30-m Image Products from the Chinese HJ-1A/B Constellation: A Case Study in Zoige Plateau, China
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Remote Sens. 2015, 7(12), 16672-16687; doi:10.3390/rs71215844

Elevation-Dependent Vegetation Greening of the Yarlung Zangbo River Basin in the Southern Tibetan Plateau, 1999–2013

1
Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection, Nanjing 210042, China
2
Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
3
Collaborative Innovation Center of Sustainable Forestry in Southern China of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China
4
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
5
College of Biology and the Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing 210037, China
6
Department of Microbiology & Plant Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alfredo R. Huete and Prasad S. Thenkabail
Received: 26 October 2015 / Revised: 30 November 2015 / Accepted: 1 December 2015 / Published: 8 December 2015
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6226 KB, uploaded 9 December 2015]   |  

Abstract

The Yarlung Zangbo River basin is an important alley to transport moisture from the Indian Ocean to the inner Tibetan Plateau. With a wide range of elevations from 147 m to over 7000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), ecosystems respond differently to climate change at various elevations. However, the pattern of elevation-dependent vegetation change and how it responds to recent warming have been rarely reported. Here, we investigated the pattern of vegetation greening at different elevations in this river basin using SPOT normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data during 1999–2013, and examined its relationship with elevation-dependent changes in temperature and precipitation. The annual NDVI has increased by 8.83% from 1999 to 2013. In particular, the NDVI increased more apparently at lower elevations, but remained relatively stable or even decreased at high elevations. It seems that rising temperature has driven the basin-wide vegetation greening, but the greening rate is in contrast to the pattern of elevation-dependent warming (EDW) with more significant temperature increase at higher elevations. It appears that decreasing precipitation does not reverse the overall increasing trend in NDVI, but relatively limited precipitation (<500 mm) may constrain the NDVI increases, causing apparently stable or even decreased NDVI at higher elevations (>4000 m). View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetation greening; elevation gradient; Tibetan Plateau; climate change; precipitation decrease; normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI); Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) derived precipitation vegetation greening; elevation gradient; Tibetan Plateau; climate change; precipitation decrease; normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI); Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) derived precipitation
Figures

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Li, H.; Li, Y.; Shen, W.; Li, Y.; Lin, J.; Lu, X.; Xu, X.; Jiang, J. Elevation-Dependent Vegetation Greening of the Yarlung Zangbo River Basin in the Southern Tibetan Plateau, 1999–2013. Remote Sens. 2015, 7, 16672-16687.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Remote Sens. EISSN 2072-4292 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top