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Remote Sens. 2018, 10(9), 1469; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10091469

Observing Water Vapour in the Planetary Boundary Layer from the Short-Wave Infrared

1
Earth Observation Science, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
2
National Centre for Earth Observation, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
3
Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, Ecole Polytechnique–CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 July 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 11 September 2018 / Published: 14 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing Water Cycle: Theory, Sensors, Data, and Applications)
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Abstract

Water vapour is a key greenhouse gas in the Earth climate system. In this golden age of satellite remote sensing, global observations of water vapour fields are made from numerous instruments measuring in the ultraviolet/visible, through the infrared bands, to the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. While these observations provide a wealth of information on columnar, free-tropospheric and upper troposphere/lower stratosphere water vapour amounts, there is still an observational gap regarding resolved bulk planetary boundary layer (PBL) concentrations. In this study we demonstrate the ability of the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) to bridge this gap from highly resolved measurements in the shortwave infrared (SWIR). These new measurements of near surface columnar water vapour are free of topographic artefacts and are interpreted as a proxy for bulk PBL water vapour. Validation (over land surfaces only) of this new data set against global radiosondes show low biases that vary seasonally between −2% to 5%. Analysis on broad latitudinal bands show biases between −3% and 2% moving from high latitudes to the equatorial regions. Finally, with the extension of the GOSAT program out to at least 2027, we discuss the potential for a new GOSAT PBL water vapour Climate Data Record (CDR). View Full-Text
Keywords: GOSAT; SWIR; boundary layer; water vapour; validation; ARSA; radiosonde GOSAT; SWIR; boundary layer; water vapour; validation; ARSA; radiosonde
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Trent, T.; Boesch, H.; Somkuti, P.; Scott, N.A. Observing Water Vapour in the Planetary Boundary Layer from the Short-Wave Infrared. Remote Sens. 2018, 10, 1469.

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