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Sustainability 2017, 9(6), 1000; doi:10.3390/su9061000

Yield and Milk Composition at Different Stages of Lactation from a Small Herd of Nguni, Boer, and Non-Descript Goats Raised in an Extensive Production System

1
Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare, Private Bag X1314, Alice 5700, South Africa
2
Fort Cox College of Agriculture and Forestry, P.O. Box 2187, King William’s Town 5600, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marc A. Rosen
Received: 4 April 2017 / Revised: 21 May 2017 / Accepted: 7 June 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
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Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the yield and composition of milk from 30 indigenous South African goats of different genotypes, namely Nguni, Boer, and non-descript, reared under a free-ranging system. Milk yield and composition (milk fat, protein, lactose, solid non-fat, and minerals) from Nguni (10), Boer (10) and non-descript (10) goats were measured and analysed per week at each stage of lactation. Results showed that Nguni goats produced (1.2 ± 0.09, 1.3 ± 0.11 and 1.2 ± 0.07 litres per day) more milk (p < 0.05) at early, mid-, and late stages of lactation than Boer (0.6 ± 0.10, 1.0 ± 0.17, and 0.6 ± 0.09 litres per day) and non-descript (0.3 ± 0.10, 0.3 ± 0.12, and 0.3 ± 0.09 litres per day) goats, respectively. The mean value of milk fat, protein, and lactose content from Nguni goats was 3.98, 3.54, and 5.31; Boer goats, 2.9, 3.59, and 5.04 and non-descript goats, 4.05, 3.39, and 5.02, respectively. There was a significant effect (p < 0.05) of genotypes on milk fat, milk magnesium, and sodium contents of Nguni, Boer, and non-descript goats. It could be concluded that Nguni goats produced more milk than Boer and non-descript goats, but the non-descript goat had a higher mean percentage of milk fat compared to Nguni and Boer goats. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous goats; free range; milk production; milk composition indigenous goats; free range; milk production; milk composition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Idamokoro, E.M.; Muchenje, V.; Masika, P.J. Yield and Milk Composition at Different Stages of Lactation from a Small Herd of Nguni, Boer, and Non-Descript Goats Raised in an Extensive Production System. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1000.

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