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Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 556; doi:10.3390/su9040556

Are Consumers Willing to Pay More for a “Made in” Product? An Empirical Investigation on “Made in Italy”

1
Department of Economics and Law, Cassino University, Viale dell’ Università, 03043 Cassino, Italy
2
Department of Management, Sapienza University of Rome, Via del Castro Laurenziano 9, 00161 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alessandro Ruggieri, Samuel Petros Sebhatu and Zenon Foltynowicz
Received: 29 December 2016 / Revised: 27 March 2017 / Accepted: 3 April 2017 / Published: 6 April 2017
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Abstract

The paper aims to explore consumer behavior towards “Made in” products in order to determine the associated quality and value-attributes related to the purchasing intention of consumers. In particular, the article presents the comments and results deriving from an empirical investigation on “Made in Italy”. The research questions addressed are: (1) Does recognition really exist in terms of qualitative characterization of “Made in Italy” products? And if yes; (2) Does willingness to pay a “premium price” for such products exist in quantitative terms? The study is characterized by two phases. From a theoretical standpoint, the main literature on the topic is presented through the identification and deepening of the scientific strand of reference, such as the Country of Origin, the Country Image and the Brand Image, placing them in a broader context on Willingness to Pay. From an experimental standpoint, the research group investigates the existence and the type of relationship between the perception of quality and the willingness to pay for “Made in Italy” products. The summarized main findings show (1) “Made in Italy” is well established as a conceptual category in the minds of consumers; and (2) there is a significant “premium price” recognized by consumers for “Made in Italy” in the three sectors analyzed (food, fashion and furnishings). The “premium price” is not homogeneously recognized for the various product sectors analyzed, although for all the sectors the most commonly encountered value is relative to 10–30%. View Full-Text
Keywords: Made in Italy; quality; willingness to pay; Country of Origin; country image; brand image; consumer attitude; commodity; sustainability Made in Italy; quality; willingness to pay; Country of Origin; country image; brand image; consumer attitude; commodity; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cappelli, L.; D’Ascenzo, F.; Natale, L.; Rossetti, F.; Ruggieri, R.; Vistocco, D. Are Consumers Willing to Pay More for a “Made in” Product? An Empirical Investigation on “Made in Italy”. Sustainability 2017, 9, 556.

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