Next Article in Journal
Application of Eco-Design and Life Cycle Assessment Standards for Environmental Impact Reduction of an Industrial Product
Previous Article in Journal
A New Framework for Understanding Urban Social Vulnerability from a Network Perspective
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1651; doi:10.3390/su9101651

Consumers’ Social Representations of Meat Safety in Two Selected Restaurants of Raymond Mhlaba Municipality in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

1
Department of Livestock and Pasture Science, University of Fort Hare, P. Bag X1314, Alice 5700, Eastern Cape, South Africa
2
Institute for Rural Development, University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou 0950, Limpopo, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 July 2017 / Revised: 5 September 2017 / Accepted: 14 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [223 KB, uploaded 26 September 2017]

Abstract

This study was conducted at two different restaurants of Raymond Mhlaba Municipality (Alice), Eastern Cape, South Africa, to determine consumers’ social representations of meat safety. A total number of 251 people were interviewed in focus group discussions, each comprising 4–6 interviewees were conducted. Each focus group consisted of university students and staff, and members of rural communities surrounding the town of Alice. A semi-structured questionnaire comprising both closed-ended and open-ended questions was used to collect data. Consumers were concerned about the hygiene at the place of purchase and the freshness of meat. Moreover, they revealed that they were always worried about the risk of food-borne diseases. Although food-borne diseases were not cited as a significant problem, related ideas such as “washing of hands before preparation of food to minimize food-borne diseases” were important to consumers. Consumers indicated that meat safety at the abattoirs should be thoroughly managed given that “hygiene during meat processing is important to prevent the occurrence of food-borne diseases”. Consumers in both retail outlets have shown to have a limited understanding of meat safety. Thus, consumers’ social representations, perceptions, and knowledge are complex and dynamic with respect to meat safety. View Full-Text
Keywords: consumers’ knowledge; food-borne diseases; meat supply chain; microbial contamination consumers’ knowledge; food-borne diseases; meat supply chain; microbial contamination
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Dastile, L.S.; Francis, J.; Muchenje, V. Consumers’ Social Representations of Meat Safety in Two Selected Restaurants of Raymond Mhlaba Municipality in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Sustainability 2017, 9, 1651.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top