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Sustainability 2017, 9(1), 140; doi:10.3390/su9010140

Potential of Vertical Hydroponic Agriculture in Mexico

1
Department of Environmental Technology, Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco, A. C. Normalistas 800, Colinas de la Normal, Guadalajara, Jalisco C.P. 44270, Mexico
2
Department of Geography, University of Toronto-Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sanzidur Rahman
Received: 1 November 2016 / Revised: 11 January 2017 / Accepted: 13 January 2017 / Published: 20 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Agriculture and Development)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3035 KB, uploaded 20 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

In 2050, Mexico’s population will reach 150 million people, about 80% of whom will likely live in urban centers. This increase in population will necessitate increased food production in the country. The lands classified as drylands in Mexico occupy approximately 101.5 million hectares, or just over half the territory, limiting the potential for agricultural expansion. In addition to the problem of arid conditions in Mexico, there are conditions in other parts of the country related to low to very low water availability, resulting in pressure on the water resources in almost two-thirds of the country. Currently, agriculture uses 77% of the water withdrawn, primarily for food production. This sector contributes 12% of the total greenhouse gas emission (GHG) production in the country. Given the conditions of pressure on water and land resources in Mexico and the need to reduce the carbon footprint, vertical farming technology could offer the possibility for sustainable food production in the urban areas of the country in the coming years. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable agriculture; food security; drylands; greenhouse horticulture; protected agriculture; vertical farming; Mexico sustainable agriculture; food security; drylands; greenhouse horticulture; protected agriculture; vertical farming; Mexico
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de Anda, J.; Shear, H. Potential of Vertical Hydroponic Agriculture in Mexico. Sustainability 2017, 9, 140.

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