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Sustainability 2016, 8(9), 850; doi:10.3390/su8090850

Research of Interindividual Differences in Physiological Response under Hot-Dry and Warm-Wet Climates

School of Environment Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, 92 Weijin Road, Tianjin 300072, China
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Academic Editor: Rachel J.C. Chen
Received: 30 May 2016 / Revised: 31 July 2016 / Accepted: 19 August 2016 / Published: 26 August 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Impacts of Climate Changes: From Sustainability Perspectives)
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Abstract

Somatotype and habitus parameters may affect physiological control system, so the changes of physiological parameters are not the same when various people work in hot-dry and warm-wet climates. In this paper, a chamber built in Tianjin University was used to simulate comfortable, hot-dry and warm-wet climates. Sixty healthy university students were selected as subjects who were divided into four groups based on somatotype and habitus differences. The subjects were asked to exercise on a treadmill at moderate and heavy work intensities. Physiological parameters (rectal temperature and heart rate) were measured after every 10-min work in the climate chamber. For different groups, the change trends of physiological parameters were different. With the enhancement of experimental conditions, the differences among four groups were weakened. Body surface area per unit of body mass (BSA/mass), percentage of body fat (%fat), and maximum oxygen consumption per unit of body mass (VO2max/mass) were adopt to establish a revised body characteristic index (RBCI). RBCI was proved having significant correlation with physiological parameters, which means RBCI as the combined factors of somatotype and habitus parameters can be applied to evaluate the effect of individual characteristics on physiological systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: hot-dry and warm-wet climates; somatotype and habitus parameters; rectal temperature; heart rate; RBCI hot-dry and warm-wet climates; somatotype and habitus parameters; rectal temperature; heart rate; RBCI
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Lu, S.; Sun, L.; Peng, H.; Ji, L. Research of Interindividual Differences in Physiological Response under Hot-Dry and Warm-Wet Climates. Sustainability 2016, 8, 850.

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