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Sustainability 2016, 8(8), 712; doi:10.3390/su8080712

Too Much Is as Bad as Too Little? Sources of the Intention-Achievement Gap in Sustainable Innovation

1
School of Management, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
2
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, College of Business, Seoul 02455, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Beatriz Junquera
Received: 10 June 2016 / Revised: 18 July 2016 / Accepted: 21 July 2016 / Published: 25 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eco-innovation and Competitiveness)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [224 KB, uploaded 25 July 2016]

Abstract

Prior work on innovation has generally emphasized the importance of an organization’s exposure to external knowledge. This study, in contrast, redirects our attention toward conditions under which such exposure serves as constraints on organizational endeavors to achieve environmentally preferable innovation. We develop a two-stage model for sustainable innovation. A firm in the first stage explores a variety of alternatives and develops strategic intentions to address broader environmental concerns; thus, it may benefit from access to both diverse sources of external knowledge and network ties that enable an extensive search for new information. In the second stage, a firm exploits limited available options to achieve its strategic intentions. We suggest that dependence on external knowledge in the first stage makes the transition toward the second stage challenging, thereby reducing the probability that a firm’s strategic intentions for sustainability result in actual innovation outcomes. We test our theory using the 2014 Korean Innovation Survey. Our results show that diverse sources of external knowledge through rich network ties, albeit the positive main effects on innovation outcomes, negatively moderate the relationship between a firm’s intentions for environmental sustainability and its achievement of sustainable innovation. Several theoretical and practical implications are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental sustainability; strategic intention-achievement gap; external knowledge; sustainable innovation; organizational learning; social network environmental sustainability; strategic intention-achievement gap; external knowledge; sustainable innovation; organizational learning; social network
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Yang, D.; Park, S. Too Much Is as Bad as Too Little? Sources of the Intention-Achievement Gap in Sustainable Innovation. Sustainability 2016, 8, 712.

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