Next Article in Journal
Evaluation Analysis of the CO2 Emission and Absorption Life Cycle for Precast Concrete in Korea
Next Article in Special Issue
Comparing Conceptualizations of Urban Climate Resilience in Theory and Practice
Previous Article in Journal
Eliciting Drivers of Community Perceptions of Mining Projects through Effective Community Engagement
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2016, 8(7), 664; doi:10.3390/su8070664

Between Participation and Collective Action—From Occasional Liaisons towards Long-Term Co-Management for Urban Resilience

Department of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna 1180, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Tan Yigitcanlar
Received: 24 May 2016 / Revised: 20 June 2016 / Accepted: 6 July 2016 / Published: 13 July 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Resilience and Urban Sustainability: From Research to Practice)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [920 KB, uploaded 13 July 2016]   |  

Abstract

For resilience building, cities need to foster learning and innovation processes among all actors in order to develop transformative capacities of urban governance regimes to manage extraordinary situations as well as continuous change. A close collaboration of urban governmental actors and citizens is, therefore, of high importance. This paper explores two different discourses on urban governance: participation and self-organized collective action for the management of the commons. Both address the involvement of citizens into governance, albeit from different perspectives: on the one hand from the viewpoint of the government, selectively handing some of its power over to citizens, on the other hand from the perspective of citizens who self-organize for a collective management of urban commons. Based on experiences in the Austrian city of Korneuburg, it is argued that the collective action literature may help overcome some of the self-criticisms and shortcomings of the participation discourse. More specifically, Elinor Ostrom’s design principles for the management of the commons provide valuable input to overcome restrictions in thinking about citizen participation and to effectively design institutions for long-term urban co-management. View Full-Text
Keywords: cities; participation; urban resilience; urban commons; collective action; collaboration agreements; urban planning; self-organization; co-management cities; participation; urban resilience; urban commons; collective action; collaboration agreements; urban planning; self-organization; co-management
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Schauppenlehner-Kloyber, E.; Penker, M. Between Participation and Collective Action—From Occasional Liaisons towards Long-Term Co-Management for Urban Resilience. Sustainability 2016, 8, 664.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top