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Sustainability 2016, 8(10), 972; doi:10.3390/su8100972

Nitrogen and Sediment Capture of a Floating Treatment Wetland on an Urban Stormwater Retention Pond—The Case of the Rain Project

Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vincenzo Torretta
Received: 6 August 2016 / Revised: 16 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 24 September 2016
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Abstract

Nitrogen is widely recognized as a chronic urban stormwater pollutant. In the United States, wet retention ponds have become widely used to treat urban runoff for quantity and quality. While wet ponds typically function well for the removal of sediments, nitrogen removal, performance can be inconsistent due to poor design and/or lack of maintenance. Retrofitting ponds to improve their nitrogen capture performance, however, is often expensive. By hydroponically growing macrophytes on wet ponds, floating treatment wetlands (FTW) may provide a cheap, sustainable means of improving nitrogen removal efficiency of aging stormwater ponds. Few studies have been performed on the effectiveness real-world stormwater systems, however. In this study, we investigated the nitrogen and sediment capture performance of a 50 m2 floating treatment wetland deployed for 137 days on a stormwater wet pond located within an urban university campus near Washington, D.C. A total of 2684 g of biomass was produced, 3100 g of sediment captured, and 191 g of nitrogen removed from the pond. Although biomass production was relatively low (53 g/m2), we found that nitrogen uptake by the plants (0.009 g/m2/day) was comparable to contemporary FTW studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: floating treatment wetland; sustainable stormwater management; stormwater detention pond; nitrogen removal; water quality; wetland plant biomass; The Rain Project floating treatment wetland; sustainable stormwater management; stormwater detention pond; nitrogen removal; water quality; wetland plant biomass; The Rain Project
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

McAndrew, B.; Ahn, C.; Spooner, J. Nitrogen and Sediment Capture of a Floating Treatment Wetland on an Urban Stormwater Retention Pond—The Case of the Rain Project. Sustainability 2016, 8, 972.

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