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Sustainability 2016, 8(10), 969; doi:10.3390/su8100969

For a Green Stadium: Economic Feasibility of Sustainable Renewable Electricity Generation at the Jeju World Cup Venue

1
Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT), Goyang, Gyeonggi-do 10223, Korea
2
Department of Business Administration, Dongguk University, Gyeongju 38066, Korea
3
Robotic Intelligence Laboratory, University Jaume-I, Castellón de la Plana 12071, Spain
4
Department of Interaction Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 03063, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andrew Kusiak
Received: 20 June 2016 / Revised: 14 September 2016 / Accepted: 15 September 2016 / Published: 23 September 2016
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [4195 KB, uploaded 23 September 2016]   |  

Abstract

After the 2002 FIFA World Cup in South Korea and Japan, the local governments of South Korea were left in charge of several large-scale soccer stadiums. Although these governments have made significant efforts toward creating profits from the stadiums, it is proving to be too difficult for several administrations to cover their full operational, maintenance, and conservation costs. In order to overcome this problem, one of the governments, Seogwipo City, which owns Jeju World Cup Stadium (JWCS), is attempting to provide an independent renewable electricity generation system for the operation of the stadium. The current study therefore examines potential configurations of an independent renewable electricity generation system for JWCS, using HOMER software. The simulation results yield three optimal system configurations with a renewable fraction of 1.00 and relatively low values for the cost of energy ($0.405, $0.546, and $0.692 per kWh). Through the examination of these three possible optimal configurations, the implications and limitations of the current study are presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: HOMER; green building; green stadium; optimal solutions; Jeju World Cup Stadium HOMER; green building; green stadium; optimal solutions; Jeju World Cup Stadium
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Park, E.; Kwon, S.J.; del Pobil, A.P. For a Green Stadium: Economic Feasibility of Sustainable Renewable Electricity Generation at the Jeju World Cup Venue. Sustainability 2016, 8, 969.

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