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Sustainability 2016, 8(1), 6; doi:10.3390/su8010006

Motivating Action through Fostering Climate Change Hope and Concern and Avoiding Despair among Adolescents

Fisheries, Wildlife & Conservation Biology Program, Department of Forestry & Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
These authors contributed equally to this work.
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ian Thomas
Received: 2 December 2015 / Revised: 17 December 2015 / Accepted: 18 December 2015 / Published: 23 December 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Education and Approaches)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [198 KB, uploaded 23 December 2015]

Abstract

Efforts to build climate change concern seem warranted to overcome apathy and promote action. However, research suggests that these efforts can backfire by breeding despair, denial and inaction. This may be especially true among younger audiences, as despair is highest among those who view climate challenges as out of their control, and children generally have lower perceived and actual control than adults in political and personal arenas. Though many studies have documented feelings of despair and sadness among younger audiences, few have explored how climate change hope may counteract despair and encourage productive responses to climate change concern. This study examined how climate change hope, despair, and concern predict pro-environmental behavior with a quantitative survey of a random sample of middle school students in North Carolina, USA (n = 1486). We did not find an interaction between climate change hope and concern or despair, but instead found climate change hope and concern independently and positively related to behavior and despair negatively related to behavior. These results suggest that climate change concern among K-12 audiences may be an important antecedent to behavior which does not dampen the positive impacts of hope. Further, rather than mitigating the negative effects of climate change despair, hope may be an independent predecessor to behavior. Students at Title I (a measure of low socioeconomic status) schools were less likely to engage in pro-environmental behaviors, suggesting climate literacy efforts should target schools with lower levels of socioeconomic status specifically. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate literacy; concern; hope; climate action; pro-environmental behavior climate literacy; concern; hope; climate action; pro-environmental behavior
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Stevenson, K.; Peterson, N. Motivating Action through Fostering Climate Change Hope and Concern and Avoiding Despair among Adolescents. Sustainability 2016, 8, 6.

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