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Sustainability 2015, 7(2), 2066-2085; doi:10.3390/su7022066

Measurement and Numerical Simulation of Air Velocity in a Tunnel-Ventilated Broiler House

1
Institute of Animal Science and Technology, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
2
Department of Construction Engineering and Civil Projects, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
3
Department of Applied Physics (U.D. Industrial Engineering), Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Marc A. Rosen
Received: 23 October 2014 / Revised: 5 February 2015 / Accepted: 6 February 2015 / Published: 13 February 2015
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Engineering and Science)
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Abstract

A building needs to be designed for the whole period of its useful life according to its requirements. However, future climate predictions involve some uncertainty. Thus, several sustainable strategies of adaptation need to be incorporated after the initial design. In this sense, tunnel ventilation in broiler houses provides high air velocity values (2–3 m·s−1) at animal level to diminish their thermal stress and associated mortality. This ventilation system was experimentally incorporated into a Mediterranean climate. The aim was to resolve these thermal problems in hot seasons, as (traditional) cross-mechanical ventilation does not provide enough air velocity values. Surprisingly, very little information on tunnel ventilation systems is available, especially in terms of air velocity. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and a multi-sensor system, the average results are similar (at animal level: 1.59 ± 0.68 m·s−1 for CFD and 1.55 ± 0.66 m·s−1 for measurements). The ANOVA for validation concluded that the use of CFD or measurements is not significant (p-value = 0.1155). Nevertheless, some problems with air velocity distribution were found and need to be solved. To this end, CFD techniques can help by means of virtual designs and scenarios providing information for the whole indoor space. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainable design; adaptation and retrofit (A & R); broiler house; Mediterranean climate; tunnel ventilation; sensors; CFD sustainable design; adaptation and retrofit (A & R); broiler house; Mediterranean climate; tunnel ventilation; sensors; CFD
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Bustamante, E.; García-Diego, F.-J.; Calvet, S.; Torres, A.G.; Hospitaler, A. Measurement and Numerical Simulation of Air Velocity in a Tunnel-Ventilated Broiler House. Sustainability 2015, 7, 2066-2085.

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