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Sustainability 2015, 7(11), 14574-14596; doi:10.3390/su71114574

From Anti-Pollution to Climate Change Risk Movement: Reshaping Civic Epistemology

1
Risk Society and Policy Research Center, Social Science College, National Taiwan University, No.1, Section 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10167, Taiwan
2
Graduate Institute of National Development, National Taiwan University, No.1, Section 4 Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10167, Taiwan
Academic Editor: Rafael D’Almeida Martins
Received: 9 June 2015 / Revised: 22 October 2015 / Accepted: 28 October 2015 / Published: 30 October 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Strategies to Adapt to Climate Change)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [732 KB, uploaded 18 November 2015]

Abstract

From the perspective of reflexive governance, this study probes into the transformative capacity and roles of government and civil society, and aims to determine how the authoritative developmental neo-liberalism state was challenged by civil society in democratization from the end of the 1980s, when it encountered a crisis of governance legitimacy. By analyzing the anti-petrochemical movement of the recent two decades, this paper recognizes the important historic line, and proposes that without innovative governance, a regime of expert politics with hidden and delayed risk will result in higher degrees of mistrust and confrontational positions by the public. In contrast to the government, local and civil societies are growing through the anti-pollution appeals of simple group protests into systematic and robust civic knowledge and strategic action. By administrative, legislative, judicial, and risk statement paths, such strategic mobilizations break through authoritative expert politics and reshape new civic epistemology. The process of reflexive governance is extremely radical. When two parties cannot commit to dealing with a high degree of mistrust, they will not be able to manage the more dramatic threat of climate change. Fundamentally speaking, a robust civil society will be an important driving power competing with government, in terms of constructing innovative governance. View Full-Text
Keywords: expert politics; neo-liberal developmentalism; transformative capacity; social robustness; innovative governance expert politics; neo-liberal developmentalism; transformative capacity; social robustness; innovative governance
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Chou, K.T. From Anti-Pollution to Climate Change Risk Movement: Reshaping Civic Epistemology. Sustainability 2015, 7, 14574-14596.

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