Next Article in Journal
Impacts of Organic Zero Tillage Systems on Crops, Weeds, and Soil Quality
Next Article in Special Issue
Cultural Resources as Sustainability Enablers: Towards a Community-Based Cultural Heritage Resources Management (COBACHREM) Model
Previous Article in Journal
Composting Used as a Low Cost Method for Pathogen Elimination in Sewage Sludge in Mérida, Mexico
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sustainable and Balanced Energy Efficiency and Preservation in Our Built Heritage
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2013, 5(7), 3159-3171; doi:10.3390/su5073159

World Heritage Protection and the Human Right to Development: Reconciling Competing or Complimentary Narratives Using a Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA)?

School of Geosciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
Received: 30 April 2013 / Revised: 4 July 2013 / Accepted: 15 July 2013 / Published: 22 July 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Constructing Heritage in the Light of Sustainable Development)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [584 KB, uploaded 24 February 2015]

Abstract

In the pursuit of the protection of places worthy of World Heritage designation, controls are placed on human activities. Regulations are put in place to curb the extent to which these places of heritage significance might be compromised by inappropriate human uses. For the most part, this conservation exercise takes the form of a regulatory regime that, in reality, imposes localized restrictions on how people interact with the protected site. Such restrictions can come at considerable expense to pre-existing users, and arguably, in some instances, these restrictions may also act to simultaneously restrict “rights”. These rights arise by virtue of a raft of international and regional commitments to human rights that, in essence, aim to preserve human dignity for all. This paper explores the nexus between conservation and development through a “rights” paradigm. Arguably, it is untenable to sustain a situation in which heritage trumps user-rights without due regard for some of the rights articulated within the human rights narrative. Heritage protection must be seen as a question of balance wherein conservation, development and rights are reconciled. It is argued that the adoption of a human rights-based approach (HRBA) to conservation may aid in the reconciliation of these goals.
Keywords: heritage protection; human rights; Angkor; world heritage; right to development; human rights based approach (HRBA) heritage protection; human rights; Angkor; world heritage; right to development; human rights based approach (HRBA)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Gillespie, J. World Heritage Protection and the Human Right to Development: Reconciling Competing or Complimentary Narratives Using a Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA)? Sustainability 2013, 5, 3159-3171.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top