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Future Internet, Volume 2, Issue 2 (June 2010), Pages 96-189

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Research

Open AccessArticle Survey on Wireless Sensor Network Technologies for Industrial Automation: The Security and Quality of Service Perspectives
Future Internet 2010, 2(2), 96-125; doi:10.3390/fi2020096
Received: 30 January 2010 / Revised: 19 March 2010 / Accepted: 24 March 2010 / Published: 8 April 2010
Cited by 36 | PDF Full-text (965 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are gradually adopted in the industrial world due to their advantages over wired networks. In addition to saving cabling costs, WSNs widen the realm of environments feasible for monitoring. They thus add sensing and acting capabilities to objects [...] Read more.
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are gradually adopted in the industrial world due to their advantages over wired networks. In addition to saving cabling costs, WSNs widen the realm of environments feasible for monitoring. They thus add sensing and acting capabilities to objects in the physical world and allow for communication among these objects or with services in the future Internet. However, the acceptance of WSNs by the industrial automation community is impeded by open issues, such as security guarantees and provision of Quality of Service (QoS). To examine both of these perspectives, we select and survey relevant WSN technologies dedicated to industrial automation. We determine QoS requirements and carry out a threat analysis, which act as basis of our evaluation of the current state-of-the-art. According to the results of this evaluation, we identify and discuss open research issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Security for Next Generation Wireless and Decentralized Systems)
Figures

Open AccessArticle QoS Provisioning Techniques for Future Fiber-Wireless (FiWi) Access Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(2), 126-155; doi:10.3390/fi2020126
Received: 23 February 2010 / Revised: 10 April 2010 / Accepted: 15 April 2010 / Published: 29 April 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (785 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A plethora of enabling optical and wireless access-metro network technologies have been emerging that can be used to build future-proof bimodal fiber-wireless (FiWi) networks. Hybrid FiWi networks aim at providing wired and wireless quad-play services over the same infrastructure simultaneously and hold great promise to mitigate the digital divide and change the way we live and work by replacing commuting with teleworking. After overviewing enabling optical and wireless network technologies and their QoS provisioning techniques, we elaborate on enabling radio-over-fiber (RoF) and radio-and-fiber (R&F) technologies. We describe and investigate new QoS provisioning techniques for future FiWi networks, ranging from traffic class mapping, scheduling, and resource management to advanced aggregation techniques, congestion control, and layer-2 path selection algorithms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)
Open AccessArticle A Distributed Infrastructure for Metadata about Metadata: The HDMM Architectural Style and PORTAL-DOORS System
Future Internet 2010, 2(2), 156-189; doi:10.3390/fi2020156
Received: 30 December 2009 / Revised: 12 April 2010 / Accepted: 20 May 2010 / Published: 1 June 2010
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (684 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Both the IRIS-DNS System and the PORTAL-DOORS System share a common architectural style for pervasive metadata networks that operate as distributed metadata management systems with hierarchical authorities for entity registering and attribute publishing. Hierarchical control of metadata redistribution throughout the registry-directory networks [...] Read more.
Both the IRIS-DNS System and the PORTAL-DOORS System share a common architectural style for pervasive metadata networks that operate as distributed metadata management systems with hierarchical authorities for entity registering and attribute publishing. Hierarchical control of metadata redistribution throughout the registry-directory networks constitutes an essential characteristic of this architectural style called Hierarchically Distributed Mobile Metadata (HDMM) with its focus on moving the metadata for who what where as fast as possible from servers in response to requests from clients. The novel concept of multilevel metadata about metadata has also been defined for the PORTAL-DOORS System with the use of entity, record, infoset, representation and message metadata. Other new features implemented include the use of aliases, priorities and metaresources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metadata and Markup)

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