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Future Internet, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2009), Pages 1-87

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial The Future Internet
Future Internet 2009, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/fi1010001
Received: 17 July 2009 / Published: 17 July 2009
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Abstract
In 1995 technology analyst Gartner [1] developed a hype cycle model for the adoption of technology. The cycle comprises five stages from the initial technology trigger through to a final plateau of productivity along a with a peak of inflated expectations, a [...] Read more.
In 1995 technology analyst Gartner [1] developed a hype cycle model for the adoption of technology. The cycle comprises five stages from the initial technology trigger through to a final plateau of productivity along a with a peak of inflated expectations, a tough of disillusionment and the slope of enlightenment. The hype cycle is notable technique for plotting and identifying waves of innovation and hype in technology and digital communications. Yet, from where we stand, we can see the waves of innovation becoming increasingly shorter, the troughs less deep and the peaks of expectations higher. The read-write revolution, that is arguably known as Web 2.0, has transformed our experience of using the Internet from a source of information to a means of communication and participation. It has introduced mirror worlds, the cloud, wikitecture, social shaping, connected places, folksonomies and many other terms that I am sure many of us have used in recent grant applications and papers. This is the here and now, all of these technologies are past the technology trigger point and rising up the peak of inflated expectations with a few already heading towards the trough before becoming mainstream and approaching mass adoption. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Learning Space Mashups: Combining Web 2.0 Tools to Create Collaborative and Reflective Learning Spaces
Future Internet 2009, 1(1), 3-13; doi:10.3390/fi1010003
Received: 29 June 2009 / Accepted: 11 July 2009 / Published: 13 July 2009
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (49 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, Web 2.0 open content mashups or combinations are explored. Two case studies of recent initial teacher training programmes are reviewed where blogs and wikis were blended to create new virtual learning spaces. In two separate studies, students offer their [...] Read more.
In this paper, Web 2.0 open content mashups or combinations are explored. Two case studies of recent initial teacher training programmes are reviewed where blogs and wikis were blended to create new virtual learning spaces. In two separate studies, students offer their views about using these tools, and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of this approach. There is also discussion about aggregation of content and a theorization of how community and personal spaces can create tension and conflict. A new ‘learning spaces’ model will be presented which aids visualization of the processes, domains and territories that are brought into play when content and Web 2.0 tools are mashed up within the same space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Mashups)
Open AccessArticle Identifying Middlewares for Mashup Personal Learning Environments
Future Internet 2009, 1(1), 14-27; doi:10.3390/fi1010014
Received: 29 July 2009 / Revised: 31 July 2009 / Accepted: 3 August 2009 / Published: 5 August 2009
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (481 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The common understanding of e-learning has shifted over the last decade from the traditional learning objects portals to learning paradigms that enforces constructivism, discovery learning and social collaboration. Such type of learning takes place outside the formal academic settings (e.g., seminars or [...] Read more.
The common understanding of e-learning has shifted over the last decade from the traditional learning objects portals to learning paradigms that enforces constructivism, discovery learning and social collaboration. Such type of learning takes place outside the formal academic settings (e.g., seminars or lectures) where a learning environment is created by using some kind of web application mashup tools. The use of these mashup tools moves the learning environment further away from being a monolithic platform towards providing an open set of learning tools, an unrestricted number of actors, and an open corpus of artifacts, either pre-existing or created by the learning process – freely combinable and utilizable by learners within their learning activities. However, collaboration, mashup and contextualization can only be supported through services, which can be created and modified dynamically based on middlewares to suit the current needs and situations of learners. This article identifies middlewares suitable for creating effective personal learning environment based on Web 2.0 mashup tools. This article also proposed a general framework for constructing such personal learning environments based on Ambient Learning realized by learning agents and the use of Enterprise Mashup servers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Mashups)
Open AccessArticle A Method for Automating Geospatial Dataset Metadata
Future Internet 2009, 1(1), 28-46; doi:10.3390/fi1010028
Received: 28 August 2009 / Revised: 1 November 2009 / Accepted: 6 November 2009 / Published: 10 November 2009
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4006 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metadata have long been recognised as crucial to geospatial asset management and discovery, and yet undertaking their creation remains an unenviable task often to be avoided. This paper proposes a practical approach designed to address such concerns, decomposing various data creation, management, [...] Read more.
Metadata have long been recognised as crucial to geospatial asset management and discovery, and yet undertaking their creation remains an unenviable task often to be avoided. This paper proposes a practical approach designed to address such concerns, decomposing various data creation, management, update and documentation process steps that are subsequently leveraged to contribute towards metadata record completion. Using a customised utility embedded within a common GIS application, metadata elements are computationally derived from an imposed feature metadata standard, dataset geometry, an integrated storage protocol and pre-prepared content, and instantiated within a common geospatial discovery convention. Yielding 27 out of a 32 total metadata elements (or 15 out of 17 mandatory elements) the approach demonstrably lessens the burden of metadata authorship. It also encourages improved geospatial asset management whilst outlining core requisites for developing a more open metadata strategy not bound to any particular application domain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metadata and Markup)
Open AccessArticle Can Weblogs and Microblogs Change Traditional Scientific Writing?
Future Internet 2009, 1(1), 47-58; doi:10.3390/fi1010047
Received: 22 September 2009 / Revised: 16 November 2009 / Accepted: 16 November 2009 / Published: 18 November 2009
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (390 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper describes a follow-up Web 2.0 approach to a technology enhanced master course for students of Graz University of Technology. The lecture “Social Aspects of Information Technology” has a long tradition for using new didactical scenarios as well as modern e-Learning [...] Read more.
This paper describes a follow-up Web 2.0 approach to a technology enhanced master course for students of Graz University of Technology. The lecture “Social Aspects of Information Technology” has a long tradition for using new didactical scenarios as well as modern e-Learning technologies. After using a blogosphere one year ago, this year microblog channels helped to expand the traditional lecture. Students choose (on a voluntary basis) whether they want to participate in a blogging/microblogging group instead of using conventional methods called Scientific Writer/Scientific Reviewer. This study addresses the question whether this method can change the learning outcome into a more reflective one. Furthermore, peer-reviewing groups judge the quality of essays and blog contributions. In this paper we examine if microblogging can be an appropriate technology for assisting the process. This publication comes to the conclusion that an amazing potential and a new way to work with information is opened when using microblogging. Students seem to be more engaged, reflective and critical in as much as they presented much more personal statements and opinions than years before. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview Mashups: A Literature Review and Classification Framework
Future Internet 2009, 1(1), 59-87; doi:10.3390/fi1010059
Received: 19 October 2009 / Revised: 15 December 2009 / Accepted: 16 December 2009 / Published: 22 December 2009
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (806 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The evolution of the Web over the past few years has fostered the growth of a handful of new technologies (e.g. Blogs, Wiki’s, Web Services). Recently web mashups have emerged as the newest Web technology and have gained lots of momentum and [...] Read more.
The evolution of the Web over the past few years has fostered the growth of a handful of new technologies (e.g. Blogs, Wiki’s, Web Services). Recently web mashups have emerged as the newest Web technology and have gained lots of momentum and attention from both academic and industry communities. Current mashup literature focuses on a wide array of issues, which can be partially explained by how new the topic is. However, to date, mashup literature lacks an articulation of the different subtopics of web mashup research. This study presents a broad review of mashup literature to help frame the 1subtopics in mashup research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Mashups)

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