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Pharmaceutics, Volume 4, Issue 4 (December 2012), Pages 494-665

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 494-500; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040494
Received: 5 July 2012 / Revised: 16 August 2012 / Accepted: 18 September 2012 / Published: 27 September 2012
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Abstract
The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and
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The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 2nd Electronic Conference on Pharmaceutical Sciences)
Open AccessCommunication Development Strategies for Herbal Products Reducing the Influence of Natural Variance in Dry Mass on Tableting Properties and Tablet Characteristics
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 501-516; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040501
Received: 14 May 2012 / Revised: 7 September 2012 / Accepted: 20 September 2012 / Published: 8 October 2012
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Abstract
One “Quality by Design” approach is the focus on the variability of the properties of the active substance. This is crucially important for active substances that are obtained from natural resources such as herbal plant material and extracts. In this paper, we present
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One “Quality by Design” approach is the focus on the variability of the properties of the active substance. This is crucially important for active substances that are obtained from natural resources such as herbal plant material and extracts. In this paper, we present various strategies for the development of herbal products especially taking into account the natural batch-to-batch variability (mainly of the dry mass) of tablets that contain a fixed amount of tincture. The following steps in the development have been evaluated for the outcome of the physico-chemical properties of the resulting tablets and intermediates: concentration of the tincture extracted from Echinacea fresh plant, loading of the concentrate onto an inert carrier, the respective wet granulation and drying step, including milling, and the adjuvant excipients for the tablet compression step. The responses that were investigated are the mean particle size of the dried and milled granulates, compaction properties and disintegration time of the tablets. Increased particle size showed a significant increase of the disintegration time and a decrease of the compaction properties. In addition, our results showed that the particle size has a great dependency on the ratio of liquid to carrier during the wet granulation process. Thus, the variability of the respective parameters tested was influenced by the performed strategies, which is how the tincture correlated to its dry mass and the relation of the amount of carrier used. In order to optimize these parameters, a strategy considering the above-mentioned points has to be chosen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 2nd Electronic Conference on Pharmaceutical Sciences)
Open AccessArticle Bioavailability of a Lipidic Formulation of Curcumin in Healthy Human Volunteers
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 517-530; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040517
Received: 15 June 2012 / Revised: 21 August 2012 / Accepted: 27 September 2012 / Published: 9 October 2012
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Numerous publications have reported the significant pharmacodynamic activity of Curcumin (CRM) despite low or undetectable levels in plasma. The objective of the present study was to perform a detailed pharmacokinetic evaluation of CRM after the oral administration of a highly bioavailable lipidic formulation
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Numerous publications have reported the significant pharmacodynamic activity of Curcumin (CRM) despite low or undetectable levels in plasma. The objective of the present study was to perform a detailed pharmacokinetic evaluation of CRM after the oral administration of a highly bioavailable lipidic formulation of CRM (CRM-LF) in human subjects. Cmax, Tmax and AUC0–¥ were found to be 183.35 ± 37.54 ng/mL, 0.60 ± 0.05 h and 321.12 ± 25.55 ng/mL respectively, at a dose of 750 mg. The plasma profile clearly showed three distinct phases, viz., absorption, distribution and elimination. A close evaluation of the primary pharmacokinetic parameters provided valuable insight into the behavior of the CRM after absorption by CRM-LF. CRM-LF showed a lag time (Tlag) of 0.18 h (around 12 min). Pharmacokinetic modeling revealed that CRM-LF followed a two-compartment model with first order absorption, lag time and first order elimination. A high absorption rate constant (K01, 4.51/h) signifies that CRM-LF ensured rapid absorption of the CRM into the central compartment. This was followed by the distribution of CRM from the central to peripheral compartment (K12, 2.69/h). The rate of CRM transfer from the peripheral to central compartment (K21, 0.15/h) was slow. This encourages higher tissue levels of CRM as compared with plasma levels. The study provides an explanation of the therapeutic efficacy of CRM, despite very low/undetectable levels in the plasma. Full article
Open AccessArticle Development of a Taste-Masked Orodispersible Film Containing Dimenhydrinate
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 551-562; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040551
Received: 23 August 2012 / Revised: 17 September 2012 / Accepted: 15 October 2012 / Published: 26 October 2012
Cited by 27 | PDF Full-text (757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Orodispersible dosage forms are promising new approaches for drug delivery. They enable an easy application, as there is no need to drink high amounts of liquids or swallow large solid dosage forms. The aim of the study was to develop an orodispersible film
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Orodispersible dosage forms are promising new approaches for drug delivery. They enable an easy application, as there is no need to drink high amounts of liquids or swallow large solid dosage forms. The aim of the study was to develop an orodispersible film (ODF) as an alternative to tablets, syrups or suppositories for the treatment of vomiting and nausea, especially for the pediatric population. Formulations were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and polarized light microscopy. Additionally, two commercially available electronic taste sensing systems were used to investigate the applied taste-masking strategies. Results obtained from X-ray-diffraction and polarized light microscopy showed no recrystallization of dimenhydrinate in the formulation when cyclodextrin or maltodextrin were used as solubilizing and complexing agent. All ODFs showed fast disintegration depending on the characterization method. In order to get taste information, the dimenhydrinate formulations were analytically compared to pure drug and drug-free formulations by electronic tongues. Results obtained from both systems are comparable and were used together for the first time. It was possible to develop an ODF of dimenhydrinate that is fast disintegrating even in small volumes of liquid. Furthermore, in vitro taste assessment by two electronic tongues revealed taste-masking effects by the excipients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 2nd Electronic Conference on Pharmaceutical Sciences)
Open AccessArticle Composition Influence on Pulmonary Delivery of Rifampicin Liposomes
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 590-606; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040590
Received: 18 September 2012 / Revised: 1 November 2012 / Accepted: 16 November 2012 / Published: 27 November 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (2277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effects of lipid concentration and composition on the physicochemical properties, aerosol performance and in vitro toxicity activity of several rifampicin-loaded liposomes were investigated. To this purpose, six liposome formulations containing different amounts of soy phosphatidylcholine and hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine, with and without
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The effects of lipid concentration and composition on the physicochemical properties, aerosol performance and in vitro toxicity activity of several rifampicin-loaded liposomes were investigated. To this purpose, six liposome formulations containing different amounts of soy phosphatidylcholine and hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine, with and without cholesterol and oleic acid, were prepared and fully characterized. Uni- or oligo-lamellar, small (~100 nm), negatively charged (~60 mV) vesicles were obtained. Lipid composition affected aerosol delivery features of liposomal rifampicin; in particular, the highest phospholipid concentration led to a better packing of the vesicular bilayers with a consequent higher nebulization stability. The retention of drug in nebulized vesicles (NER%) was higher for oleic acid containing vesicles (55% ± 1.4%) than for the other samples (~47%). A549 cells were used to evaluate intracellular drug uptake and in vitro toxicity activity of rifampicin-loaded liposomes in comparison with the free drug. Cell toxicity was more evident when oleic acid containing liposomes were used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Delivery Using Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle SNEDDS Containing Poorly Water Soluble Cinnarizine; Development and in Vitro Characterization of Dispersion, Digestion and Solubilization
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 641-665; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040641
Received: 24 September 2012 / Revised: 30 November 2012 / Accepted: 3 December 2012 / Published: 14 December 2012
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (4068 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SNEDDSs) were developed using well-defined excipients with the objective of mimicking digested SNEDDSs without the use of enzymes and in vitro lipolysis models and thereby enabling studies of the morphology and size of nanoemulsions as well as digested nanoemulsions
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Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SNEDDSs) were developed using well-defined excipients with the objective of mimicking digested SNEDDSs without the use of enzymes and in vitro lipolysis models and thereby enabling studies of the morphology and size of nanoemulsions as well as digested nanoemulsions by Cryo-TEM imaging and Dynamic Light Scattering. Four SNEDDSs (I-IV) were developed. Going from SNEDDS I to IV lipid content and solubility of the model drug cinnarizine decreased, which was also the case for dispersion time and droplet size. Droplet size of all SNEDDS was evaluated at 1% (w/w) dispersion under different conditions. Cinnarizine incorporation increased the droplet size of SNEDDSs I and II whereas for SNEDDSs III and IV no difference was observed. At low pH cinnarizine had no effect on droplet size, probably due to increased aqueous solubility and partitioning into the aqueous phase. Dispersion of the SNEDDSs in Simulated Intestinal Media (SIM) containing bile salts and phospholipids resulted in a decrease in droplet size for all SNEDDS, as compared to dispersion in buffer. Increasing the bile salt/phospholipid content in the SIM decreased the droplet sizes further. Mimicked digested SNEDDS with highest lipid content (I and II) formed smaller nanoemulsion droplet sizes upon dispersion in SIM, whereas droplet size from III and IV were virtually unchanged by digestion. Increasing the bile acid/phosphatidylcholine content in the SIM generally decreased droplet size, due to the solubilizing power of the endogenous surfactants. Digestion of SNEDDSs II resulted in formation of vesicles or micelles in fasted and fed state SIM, respectively. The developed and characterized SNEDDS provide for a better knowledge of the colloid phases generated during digestion of SNEDDS and therefore will enable studies that may yield a more detailed understanding of SNEDDS performance. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview Artificial Neural Networks in Evaluation and Optimization of Modified Release Solid Dosage Forms
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 531-550; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040531
Received: 23 July 2012 / Revised: 24 September 2012 / Accepted: 5 October 2012 / Published: 18 October 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (1090 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Implementation of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach in pharmaceutical development has compelled researchers in the pharmaceutical industry to employ Design of Experiments (DoE) as a statistical tool, in product development. Among all DoE techniques, response surface methodology (RSM) is the one most
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Implementation of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach in pharmaceutical development has compelled researchers in the pharmaceutical industry to employ Design of Experiments (DoE) as a statistical tool, in product development. Among all DoE techniques, response surface methodology (RSM) is the one most frequently used. Progress of computer science has had an impact on pharmaceutical development as well. Simultaneous with the implementation of statistical methods, machine learning tools took an important place in drug formulation. Twenty years ago, the first papers describing application of artificial neural networks in optimization of modified release products appeared. Since then, a lot of work has been done towards implementation of new techniques, especially Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) in modeling of production, drug release and drug stability of modified release solid dosage forms. The aim of this paper is to review artificial neural networks in evaluation and optimization of modified release solid dosage forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid Dosage Forms)
Open AccessReview Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) in Preclinical Studies of Antivascular Treatments
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 563-589; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040563
Received: 29 June 2012 / Revised: 29 October 2012 / Accepted: 30 October 2012 / Published: 7 November 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (286 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential.
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Antivascular treatments can either be antiangiogenic or targeting established tumour vasculature. These treatments affect the tumour microvasculature and microenvironment but may not change clinical measures like tumour volume and growth. In research on antivascular treatments, information on the tumour vasculature is therefore essential. Preclinical research is often used for optimization of antivascular drugs alone or in combined treatments. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is an in vivo imaging method providing vascular information, which has become an important tool in both preclinical and clinical research. This review discusses common DCE-MRI imaging protocols and analysis methods and provides an overview of preclinical research on antivascular treatments utilizing DCE-MRI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DCE-MRI in Preclinical Imaging)
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Open AccessReview Signal Detection and Monitoring Based on Longitudinal Healthcare Data
Pharmaceutics 2012, 4(4), 607-640; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics4040607
Received: 4 September 2012 / Revised: 15 November 2012 / Accepted: 26 November 2012 / Published: 13 December 2012
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (456 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Post-marketing detection and surveillance of potential safety hazards are crucial tasks in pharmacovigilance. To uncover such safety risks, a wide set of techniques has been developed for spontaneous reporting data and, more recently, for longitudinal data. This paper gives a broad overview of
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Post-marketing detection and surveillance of potential safety hazards are crucial tasks in pharmacovigilance. To uncover such safety risks, a wide set of techniques has been developed for spontaneous reporting data and, more recently, for longitudinal data. This paper gives a broad overview of the signal detection process and introduces some types of data sources typically used. The most commonly applied signal detection algorithms are presented, covering simple frequentistic methods like the proportional reporting rate or the reporting odds ratio, more advanced Bayesian techniques for spontaneous and longitudinal data, e.g., the Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network or the Multi-item Gamma-Poisson Shrinker and methods developed for longitudinal data only, like the IC temporal pattern detection. Additionally, the problem of adjustment for underlying confounding is discussed and the most common strategies to automatically identify false-positive signals are addressed. A drug monitoring technique based on Wald’s sequential probability ratio test is presented. For each method, a real-life application is given, and a wide set of literature for further reading is referenced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance)

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