Next Article in Journal
Frequency and Pathological Phenotype of Bovine Astrovirus CH13/NeuroS1 Infection in Neurologically-Diseased Cattle: Towards Assessment of Causality
Previous Article in Journal
Astrovirus Diagnostics
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Viruses 2017, 9(1), 4; doi:10.3390/v9010004

A Semipersistent Plant Virus Differentially Manipulates Feeding Behaviors of Different Sexes and Biotypes of Its Whitefly Vector

1
College of Plant Protection, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, China
2
Zhengzhou Fruit Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhengzhou 410100, China
3
Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616-8600, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Thomas Hohn
Received: 21 November 2016 / Accepted: 19 December 2016 / Published: 13 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Viruses of Plants, Fungi and Protozoa)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1179 KB, uploaded 13 January 2017]   |  

Abstract

It is known that plant viruses can change the performance of their vectors. However, there have been no reports on whether or how a semipersistent plant virus manipulates the feeding behaviors of its whitefly vectors. Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV) (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) is an emergent plant virus in many Asian countries and is transmitted specifically by B and Q biotypes of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), in a semipersistent manner. In the present study, we used electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique to investigate the effect of CCYV on the feeding behaviors of B. tabaci. The results showed that CCYV altered feeding behaviors of both biotypes and sexes of B. tabaci with different degrees. CCYV had stronger effects on feeding behaviors of Q biotype than those of B biotype, by increasing duration of phloem salivation and sap ingestion, and could differentially manipulate feeding behaviors of males and females in both biotype whiteflies, with more phloem ingestion in Q biotype males and more non-phloem probing in B biotype males than their respective females. With regard to feeding behaviors related to virus transmission, these results indicated that, when carrying CCYV, B. tabaci Q biotype plays more roles than B biotype, and males make greater contribution than females. View Full-Text
Keywords: cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus; CCYV; Bemisia tabaci; electrical penetration graph; EPG; feeding behaviors cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus; CCYV; Bemisia tabaci; electrical penetration graph; EPG; feeding behaviors
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Lu, S.; Li, J.; Wang, X.; Song, D.; Bai, R.; Shi, Y.; Gu, Q.; Kuo, Y.-W.; Falk, B.W.; Yan, F. A Semipersistent Plant Virus Differentially Manipulates Feeding Behaviors of Different Sexes and Biotypes of Its Whitefly Vector. Viruses 2017, 9, 4.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Viruses EISSN 1999-4915 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top